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monkey
monkey
January 14, 2015 8:25 am

@TD
Just a note on this post , it may be me but I cannot scroll/tab thro the document. I want to as this is a very interesting piece of history in terms of developing precision air drops in hazardous terrain in hostile territory and a first hand document by them that did it would be great !
(On windows 8 PC.)

Chris
Chris
January 14, 2015 8:34 am

monkey – funny; this is one of the few pages that still works on a proper PC using non-Janet & John GUI. Most new websites are hopeless on mouse & keyboard PCs but no doubt look really cool on prod & swipe pocket brains. I guess we put all this down to yet more half-baked software sold to customers before the compatibility snags, interface issues and functional bugs have been sorted. As if.

http://www.democraticunderground.com/10023143670

ArmChairCivvy
ArmChairCivvy
January 14, 2015 8:45 am

The scrolling is frozen until you install a Scribd app (free).

monkey
monkey
January 14, 2015 8:46 am


For me to run my software at home I need this and it don’t come with anything else , an 2.2Ghz i7 with 16GB RAM , more than NASA had for the first 40 years of its creation added together and it cant scroll a scanned document , hah hah no I should be crying …….

ArmChairCivvy
ArmChairCivvy
January 14, 2015 9:56 am

TD’s mobile format tweaking has made “pinch” work at least on one more tablet!
– now I get mixed up between the three different language input options I have set (my bad)

Gloomy Northern Boy
Gloomy Northern Boy
January 14, 2015 10:58 pm

@Monkey – If you manage to read the post, you might then want to turn to Defeat into Victory, Viscount Slim’s own account of the Campaign – unless of course you have already read it. Slim was a remarkable man, an outstanding General…and although I can only speak as an interested layman, much of what he did in the Burma Campaign seems to me at least a war or two ahead of his time…

If you can get a copy of the 1956 First Edition, it is more detailed than subsequent reprints…and has a very striking olive green slipcover bearing the XIV Army Badge in red.

GNB

monkey
monkey
January 14, 2015 11:14 pm

@GNB
I have not read either yet but General Slim was a very interesting man. It was a case of cometh the hour cometh the man , right man right place and the wisdom above him to see it . Thanks for the tip on the first edition.

Obsvr
Obsvr
January 15, 2015 9:49 am

I have the first edition of D i V, it was my father’s. He served in Burma, in a division that was on 100% air supply in late 1944, but with a GOC who was first rate and subsequently became CIGS, Brooke wanted him as a corps commander in Europe but he was one of the few Brit senior officers who could get on with Stillwell, so he stayed in SEAC. Rations were very bad at one stage so the old man visited the divisional airhead, total rations held – two sacks of flour! Ammo had priority.

Gloomy Northern Boy
Gloomy Northern Boy
January 15, 2015 2:35 pm

– My Father’s closest friend lost an arm in that campaign…but when they both returned to their pre-war hobby of cycling in the fifties and sixties Uncle Jo continued to win the veteran section in the annual club road race in Lincolnshire, long after my Dad hung up his clips and became a Course Marshal and Timekeeper at Farthing Corner, on the Great North Road…

They were tough old buggers in the XIV Army!

GNB

Kent
Kent
January 15, 2015 4:34 pm

A good friend of my father went to the CBI theater while my dad went to England. Mr. Edmonds flew B-24s in the 7th Heavy Bombardment Group, 10th Air Force, out of India. He said the scariest missions were flying fuel over the “Hump” to support the 308th Heavy Bombardment Group, 14th Air Force.