X1A Goldie Exoskeleton

This technology has massive potential for disability care and of course, military applications. I think we will see this technology replacing mechanical handling equipment for aircraft munitions loading and stores and pallet loading and unloading.

The state of the art keeps getting better

This technology has massive potential for disability care and of course, military applications.

I think we will see this technology replacing mechanical handling equipment for aircraft munitions loading and stores and pallet loading and unloading.

Or maybe rickshaw pulling as this video from Active Link (Panasonic) demonstrates!

3 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
mr.fred
mr.fred
December 23, 2014 12:29 pm

I agree that the first role for this in the military is likely to be logistics, either as an unusually mobile forklift or as an infantry load carrier.
Much as there would be the temptation to plate it in armour and paint it red and gold.
Does anyone have the specs for the Bell Jet belt?

monkey
monkey
December 23, 2014 1:36 pm

This is an area with potential benefits from the military to industry to medical as shown above. Many companies as well as research scientists are developing their own versions of these exoskeletons ,some even with on the market products like the HAL5 http://www.cyberdyne.jp/english/products/LowerLimb_nonmedical.html
Daewoo have an industrial one at the late development stages which is being used in its shipyards so ,excuse the pun , a step change in what a human can physically achieve is just around the corner in terms of endurance and strength. As all ways the limit is the power source but advances are coming there too.

mr.fred
mr.fred
December 23, 2014 4:01 pm

If they do take off then the price might come down from $1500 US per month – seems a bit pricey for mass use.