Set Phasers to Stun

SMU-100 Non Lethal Laser Rifle and Dazzler

The Dazzler has been developed over a number of years by Paul Kerr, an ex-Royal Marine Commando and now Head of Development at our partner Photonic Security Services. Its unique pencil-thin beam is scanned over the scene to temporarily impair vision without any danger of long-term damage to either the user or the target.

Read more the Photonics web site

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monkey
monkey
December 2, 2013 1:05 pm

This seems a very interesting tool for urban non lethal pacification. It is like man portable version of the ‘canal light’ system used in western allies invasion of europe in ww2.Are there existing defensive systems to this kind of device for drivers of ground transport or pilots for that matter .one of these could effectively bring down a plane for no recurrent cost (ie no missel/AAA ammo to replace and much more concelable than a stinger!

El Sid
El Sid
December 2, 2013 1:10 pm

What happens if the target is wearing sunglasses?

(with a suitable narrowpass filter)

Interesting that their other product is a camera-dazzling anti-paparazzi device.

brianm
brianm
December 2, 2013 6:29 pm

I was attacked with a laser pen one night while driving home.

It looked just like that. Everything went green.

Fortunately it was over in a flash (pun alert!). I didn’t hit the bollards I was approaching and there doesn’t seem to have been any long lasting damage.

And, yes, I was wondering about the sunglasses aspect too…

John Hartley
John Hartley
December 2, 2013 6:35 pm

I seem to remember a gadget called a Trillica being demonstrated on Tomorrows World, circa late 1970s, as an anti-riot device. Looked like lights for roadworks/bad disco. A bad strobe effect that made people disoriented.

whyeyeman
whyeyeman
December 2, 2013 9:57 pm

Sunglasses, well laser light is very coherent, i.e. is a single frequency, so a normal sunglass may not filter that wavelength, even a neutral density filter may not give protection at that specific wavelength, also the density of filter required to make such a laser safe is nearer to welding goggles rather than sunglasses, ( normally sunglasses absorb 50%to 90% of incident light). I notice that the operator was not wearing any form of goggles, so to defend against this the incoming boat or whatever would need to place a few corner cube reflectors on the vessel to reflect the light back to the operator. If you remember the blue goggles worn when the ruby laser range finder was used in MBT’s, that was the idea of those, to protect the user from reflections.

El Sid
El Sid
December 2, 2013 10:42 pm

That’s why I said sunglasses with a filter – there’s lots of suppliers of holographic notch filters that transmit 90% of light at other wavelengths. They’re used a lot in scientific research and spectroscopy, they’ll cost you a couple of hundred bucks for a sunglass-sized filter and come in a range of wavelengths – this looks like a standard 532nm green laser?

Red Trousers
Red Trousers
December 2, 2013 10:59 pm

I’m very slightly sceptical on that handheld device: beam width that precise needs really expensive optics, and then there’s the power requirements….. If he’s really done it, good for him, but I think he’d be the first, and it’s not often you see such precision followed by real world systems engineering coming from tiny companies. But, perhaps I’m slightly too cynical.

I recall a trial run from the AFV Gunnery School in Lulworth in about 1993: testing a frigate’s LWR by firing a Chally laser at it. About 3 miles offshore I think was the maximum (so about 4.5 miles total from the firing point).

Was there not talk of Chinese air defenders having a laser weapon that the Americans found out about? and then there was Ronald Reagan’s SDI, with a nose-mounted laser on a 747 taking out ballistic missiles. Lots of power and precision needed on that one I’d have thought, and I don’t think the project got very far off the ground.

El Sid
El Sid
December 2, 2013 11:41 pm

@RT
USN has tested a hard-kill laser for ships, LaWS (Laser Weapon System) with deployment to the Gulf due next year :
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-22076705

Raker & Shingle : https://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/2013/08/laser-beams-in-1982/

dave haine
dave haine
January 18, 2014 7:01 pm

Weren’t the T22s fitted with some sort of laser dazzly thing, designed to fry the eyes of pilots with unfriendly intentions?
Which I thought earnt us disapprobation from a number of international organisations….