Big Boys Legio Blocks

No, not a spelling mistake, the Legio building block system provides for the rapid construction of walls and security barriers.

When installing HESCO, manpower, time and fill material availability are important considerations. In the right place and right time it is easy to imagine something like this offering some advantage over HESCO or other gabbion systems for snagars, ammunition or fuel berms and security barriers for example.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOwVC_Z3-AI#stepSize=+2

 

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[browser-shot width=”600″ url=”http://www.legioblock.com/en/products”]

 

 

 

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S O
S O
November 9, 2013 9:02 pm

Quick-drying concrete is probably relevant in this context. It was a hot topic on a mil engineer conference in the mid-90’s, and I’ve never really heard about it afterwards. But such applications may actually give it a role in the military (back then the engineers thought more about repairing roads, bridges etc.).

Obsvr
Obsvr
November 10, 2013 4:12 am

Could be more vulnerable to blast and high velocity projectiles. Bagged sand is good in this environment.

Andy-M
Andy-M
November 10, 2013 2:13 pm

Reminds me of this other new way of using concrete,

http://www.concretecanvas.com/

as
as
November 10, 2013 3:12 pm
as
as
November 10, 2013 3:22 pm

dave haine
dave haine
November 10, 2013 3:47 pm

Have I walked into a ‘Taylor and Mckennas’ by mistake? Real life ‘Lego’ and ‘Mod-rock’…….

as
as
November 10, 2013 4:28 pm

Keith
Keith
November 10, 2013 6:39 pm

Just a further development over the years of what was used in N.I in the 70s and 80s. Rapid Assembly Protective Brick Wall (RAPBW) was used extensively. Once ground loaded it was easily man handled to build and once constructed quite substantive and solid.

Deja Vu
Deja Vu
November 10, 2013 8:39 pm

@TD Where do have the time to find these. The blocks considerably exceed the 20 kg manual handling limit, so I hope they can be lifted mechanically possibly with a scissor clamp like a kerb stone.

@S O. Concrete does not dry*, it sets through a chemical reaction between the cement and the water, the stone and sand are largely fillers to keep the cost down. Left to itself the reaction would be pretty quick, so small amounts of gypsum are added to inhibit the reaction and allow the concrete to be transported and poured. By playing with the chemistry faster setting concretes are possible. However the strength gain takes place over time, normally one to four weeks until full design strength is achieved.

Adding calcium chloride accelerates strength gain and used to be used in cold weather but it also corrodes embedded steel and iron. High Alumina Cement has a rapid strength gain but in the presence of moisture it converts to a weaker form. These were lessons learned at some cost in the 1960’s.

Other materials have a higher strength gain (and cost) for example magnesium based cements have been used for rapid repair of scab damage of runways.

* Embedded water that has not reacted will eventually evaporate and can cause problems with finishes if they are applied before this water has dried out, but that hardly applies to protection and barriers.

Sorry for being boring but concrete is my métier.

By the way there is a sprayed concrete called Gunnite or Shotcrete. A colleague worked on a Middle Eastern project where the nozzles disappeared at Beiruit Airport, apparently the crates were marked “Guns”.

alienated
alienated
November 10, 2013 8:51 pm

@DV Thanks. I always look to TD for concrete information of all defence matters :-)

Chris.B.
Chris.B.
November 10, 2013 9:11 pm

@ Alienated,

Oh boom!

Deja Vu
Deja Vu
November 12, 2013 2:26 pm

I eschew the abstract.

Deja Vu
Deja Vu
November 12, 2013 3:30 pm

@TD Was ever thus, concrete drying is a particular bétè noire of mine, how do folks post pictures like this one.
http://flic.kr/p/5p6rFk

Ant
Ant
November 12, 2013 8:53 pm

Yes. I once got told about that title entry in Yellow Pages by a very smug, but relieved, accountant.

Dangerous Dave
Dangerous Dave
November 12, 2013 10:03 pm

@DV
Once got into a conversation with a “gun nut” at the old Tolworth Rifle Range. When I asked him what he shot, he replied “strictly small bore”. So tempted to reply “Oh, I don’t know . . .”

Concrete is indeed fabulous, But then I have an HND in Civil Engineering from Plymouth Polytechnic!

Doodster
Doodster
November 20, 2013 3:22 pm

These blocks are made in Holland. If you wish to keep flying the flag look to http://www.eliteprecast.co.uk/interlocking-precast-concrete-blocks/legato-interlocking-concrete-blocks/

Dunservin
Dunservin
January 8, 2014 1:34 pm

@Dangerous Dave

“Once got into a conversation with a “gun nut” at the old Tolworth Rifle Range. When I asked him what he shot, he replied “strictly small bore”. So tempted to reply “Oh, I don’t know . . .”…”

An old-style Second Officer WRNS came up to me in the mess one day rattling a tin.
“What are you collecting for?” I enquired.
“Wrens’ shooting,” she replied.
“How many do you think you’ll bag?” I asked while reaching into my pocket.