Moving West

Combining digital maps, demographic and other big data often reveals significant trends.

Courtesy of the Google Maps Mania blog is information released by the EU Cohesion Policy Data initiative that shows the population of Europe is moving away from the former Eastern Bloc and migrating west.

[browser-shot width=”600″ url=”https://cohesiondata.ec.europa.eu/”]

 

Look at the net migration and population change maps.

 

 

 

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monkey
monkey
August 6, 2014 2:34 pm

Why is Germany receiving €20bn ? I thought they were the richest EU nation , in the past the EU rightly helped pay for the rebuilding of East Germany (with the contracts strangely mostly going to German companies ) but it has been 25 years since reunification so surely Germany has finished by now . If this is a historic pattern German getting 5 times more than the UK , it explain the ‘strength’ of the German economy.

Kent
Kent
August 6, 2014 3:05 pm

I was in Germany when the wall came down and the border crossings opened. I remember driving south from Frankfurt-am-Main on AB5 past Frankfurt Flughafen when traffic suddenly snarled. Up ahead, there were two Trabants, one a sedan, the other a station wagon, both with roof racks and loaded with 4 adults and what seemed to be all their worldly possessions. The problem was the sedan’s driver was bound and determined that he was going to pass the station wagon…at about 72 kph…in a 120 kph zone…with three lanes. I got off at Rheinmain AFB and went to the Rod & Gun Club instead of following my original plans. The West Germans didn’t seem to have a sense of humor about the traffic tie-up.

a
a
August 6, 2014 3:19 pm

It’s interesting that there’s so much emigration from that NE corner of Germany. What’s the story there, I wonder? Looks like people are bailing out of everywhere in the Lubeck-Rostock-Berlin-Magdeburg area… population’s dropping faster there than in Poland.

Observer
Observer
August 6, 2014 3:37 pm

monkey, don’t confuse earnings and expenses. Germany may be making the dough, but from what I heard in the initial days post unification, East Germany was very neglected and underdeveloped. Besides, it may be a case of left hand/right hand. Germany tosses coins into the pot and gets it back later after reallocation. Bureaucracy. Accounting can be a bit quirky.

Kent, one thing I did remember when the wall came down was that it happened so fast. Sure, there were rumblings that all was not well in Worker’s Paradise, but I never expected the speed which the whole deck of cards collapsed.

Optimistic time though, I remember Heart’s “You’re the voice” remake and MV. Was awesome by standards of that time. Still remember Elton John’s Nikita too. Ah, old days. :)

You guys too young to remember them I really recommend a listen to. Should be on youtube these days. Copyright expired long ago.

S O
S O
August 6, 2014 4:41 pm

“Why is Germany receiving €20bn ? I thought they were the richest EU nation , in the past the EU rightly helped pay for the rebuilding of East Germany (with the contracts strangely mostly going to German companies ) but it has been 25 years since reunification so surely Germany has finished by now . If this is a historic pattern German getting 5 times more than the UK , it explain the ‘strength’ of the German economy.”

The link has graphics which show your “5 times more than the UK” is bollocks.
Even if it wasn’t, the UK doesn’t pay terribly much into the EU becuase of excemptions.

There are areas in Germany rumoured to be marked “uninhabited” on UN maps, that’s how low the economic development has been in some areas. I personally know an overland road which was passable at no more than 30 kph – and I didn’t see a sign of human life outside the vehicle for about 30 minutes – on the afternoon.
There’s no reason why such regions should not get EU help.

Remember; even the Germans might quit if nothing they paid into the EU would flow back.

Now about the “it has been 25 years since reunification so surely Germany has finished by now”:
It has been 150 years since the industrial revolution, so for sure the Greeks have finished industrialising by now?

The UK cannot complain:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budget_of_the_European_Union#Net_contributors_and_recipients

DavidNiven
DavidNiven
August 6, 2014 4:51 pm

‘I personally know an overland road which was passable at no more than 30 kph – and I didn’t see a sign of human life outside the vehicle for about 30 minutes – on the afternoon.’

I knew a place like that in Germany as well, I can’t for the life of me remember the name now ………. I think it began with a ‘B’ ……………… and if I recall rhymed with Nelson.

(sorry couldn’t resist a poke at my grandads enemies) ;-)

Observer
Observer
August 6, 2014 4:54 pm

“It has been 150 years since the industrial revolution, so for sure the Greeks have finished industrialising by now?”

Ow… :) That one really had me laughing.

Besides, the chart shows a 6 year progression, only about 3 billion per year, about 10% of the UK’s or Germany’s annual military budget, and about 1-2% of the total annual GDP. Small blip in spending.

Kent
Kent
August 6, 2014 5:19 pm

@Observer – I remember watching this and thinking, “They’ve got Luke Skywalker on lead guitar!”

Red Trousers
Red Trousers
August 6, 2014 6:03 pm

Kent,

A similar story, from the same time. The autobahn on-ramp at Herford Ost was a half mile straight, and you could look over your left shoulder to gauge gaps in the traffic while you built up speed. It was downhill for most of the half mile.

I came onto it on a quiet day noting that there was a single small car at the end of the ramp far away, but nothing else. I built up to my normal 120 (I had an Audi Quattro at the time, reasonably powerful) while looking over my shoulder to make sure a Porsche or BMW going faster was not going to come up the autobahn. Satisfied I was clear, I looked forward.

The sodding Trabant was still at the end if the ramp, STATIONARY, indicating hopefully having failed to build up adequate speed to safely join, and about 20 metres ahead.

Big swerve and we did not meet, but I think I missed him only by a gnat’s knacker. Two tonnes of Audi hitting a quarter of ton of cardboard would not have looked survivable from the Trabant’s perspective.

Alex
Alex
August 7, 2014 8:52 am

Mate, the net contirbution is €3.5bn, the fourth-biggest.

I am beginning to think Thatcher got a terrible deal with the rebate; it’s not that much money but everyone is convinced the UK is a net recipient as a result. It’s more trouble than it’s worth.

Rocket Banana
August 7, 2014 9:04 am

What is it about Stockholm, Dublin and Murcia (Spain) that is so good?

Gloomy Northern Boy
Gloomy Northern Boy
August 8, 2014 12:01 am

@Simon – Blondes, Guinness and Tapas? :-)

GNB