Priorities and Options for SDSR 2015 – Land Command

GUEST POST FROM ANDY C

Coping with reduced overall numbers while integrating a substantially expanded reserve force, managing the withdrawal from Germany and maintaining capability was always going to be challenging.  However, in spite of much criticism the design of the Army 2020 force structure is mostly logical and compelling.

Dividing the Army into a Reaction Force, Adaptable Force and Force Troop Command enables it to maintain both a high degree of readiness and support for multiple missions.

Integrating both regular and reserve units on a three year rotation ensures that enough of them are available for potential deployment while maximising both individual and group training.

The decision to add an Infantry Battalion to the Air Assault Brigade enhances the effectiveness of this unit and means that the Reaction Force is a well-balanced and effective combat force.

The previous scenario analyses show that the Army has the structures and numbers to fulfil its missions whether it’s dealing with threats in Southern, Northern and Eastern Europe or global intervention.  In particular the ability to deploy a Brigade sized unit in the Joint Rapid Reaction Force and then scale up to full Division strength is very effective.

Enduring stabilisation can also be provided at Brigade level strength over the longer term.  However, with a higher threat level in Europe and fewer numbers in the Army compared to the last ten years it needs to be recognised that providing anything more than a Brigade for any length of time would stretch resources too thinly.

The Adaptable Force should therefore be prepared to deploy six regular Infantry Battalions and a Cavalry Regiment (around 4,000 troops) on the third, fourth and fifth roulements of a long-term deployment.  To maximise their effectiveness all regular Adaptable Force units should be available to be sent on this deployment regardless of whether their duties also include ceremonial responsibilities or other overseas postings such as Cyprus, Brunei or the Falklands.

This implies a minimum effective Adaptable Force of eighteen regular Infantry Battalions and three regular Cavalry Regiments.

There remain challenges about recruiting the necessary number of reservists to meet Future Force 2020 targets.  Part of the reason for this is the potential requirement to support lengthy overseas deployments.  This concern should be addressed by making it clear that reservists will only be deployed in exceptional circumstances.  On these occasions, when a surge in numbers is required, up to six reserve Infantry Battalions and a Cavalry Regiment (a further 2,700 troops) could be deployed.  For operations they would be fully integrated with the regular Infantry Battalions.  This would amount to half of the reserve units in the Adaptable Force and so at the end of a deployment could be replaced for one further period.

This implies a minimum effective Adaptable Force strength of twelve reserve Infantry Battalions and two Cavalry Regiments.

Challenger-RORO

The British Army needs to be able to deploy all of its main battle tanks when the need arises.

In the force comparisons with Russia the only significant inferiority of European NATO forces is in the quantity of armoured vehicles.  It is therefore essential that the British Army should examine ways to increase the effectiveness of its anti-armour capabilities.  This should include being able to deploy two Armoured Infantry Divisions to Eastern Europe and so utilise its entire force of Challenger main battle tanks.

In this situation the bulk of the Adaptable Force needs to be able to form 1st (UK) Division consisting of three Armoured Infantry Brigades.  These in turn would each be modelled on the Reaction Force’s Brigades and consist of a regular Armoured Regiment, an Armoured Cavalry Regiment plus three regular and three reserve Infantry Battalions.

To equalise numbers one regular Infantry Battalion from the Adaptable Force would also join each of the Reaction Force’s three Armoured Infantry Brigades.

That would leave six regular and three reserve Infantry Battalions to form an Infantry Brigade to deploy to Norway and help create 2nd (UK) Division.

This confirms that the Adaptable Force should consist of a minimum of eighteen regular and twelve reserve Infantry Battalions.  That is four fewer regular and one less reserve Battalion than in Army 2020.  These changes would enable 2,280 regular and 360 reserve troops to be redeployed to increase the size of the Adaptable Force Cavalry Regiments, restore all AS-90 self-propelled artillery and Starstreak SAMs from storage and address shortages in signals, engineering and logistic support sometimes referred to as the ‘hollowing out’ of the Army.

In addition the number of Brigade Headquarters in the Adaptable Force should be cut from seven to four at the expense of establishing a third (but shadow) Divisional HQ.

To maximise the effectiveness of its anti-armour capability the attack helicopter force needs to be modernised by buying either 50 new Apache AH-64Es or upgrading all 66 existing Apache AH1s to AH2 standard.  In addition, the short range Hellfire anti-armour missile should be replaced by the longer range Brimstone 2.  The Army’s Wildcat helicopters should be upgraded with a combination of Brimstone 2 and Martlet lightweight air-to-surface missiles to increase their versatility while remaining Lynx AH9As should also be upgraded with Brimstone 2.

One significant new piece of equipment now entering service, which will improve battlefield reconnaissance, are the 54 Watchkeeper UAVs that are replacing the Gazelle helicopter.

With smaller numbers, the key to the Army’s success has to be its flexibility to operate in different combat environments.  In particular the Adaptable Force needs to live up to its name and train, operate and have the appropriate equipment to be effective in different roles.

An essential part of this flexibility is the ability to deploy the Army’s full force of Challenger main battle tanks.  In addition to the Armoured Regiments of the Reaction Force some units of the Adaptable Force need to be trained to use surplus tanks that are now in storage.  Specifically three regular Light Cavalry Regiments should each be trained to operate 52 Challenger 2s as well as their Jackal 2 light reconnaissance vehicles.  This would convert them into fully Armoured Regiments when the need arose.  These 156 main battle tanks should be kept in storage at Monchengladbach in Germany with their crews being flown to them in a period of high tension.

The 224 Challenger 2s assigned to the Reaction Force will undergo a Life Extension Programme designed to maintain their capability until at least 2035.  Consideration should also be given to replacing the gun and turret to increase effectiveness and so create an upgraded Challenger 3 standard.

Scout Ajax 1

Ajax specialist vehicles and the Watchkeeper UAV will significantly enhance battlefield ISTAR.

The most significant new piece of equipment on order is the Ajax family of specialist reconnaissance vehicles.  589 are currently due to be received by 2024 to equip a total of six Armoured Cavalry Regiments and nearly all of the Reconnaissance Troops and Platoons in both the Reaction and Adaptable Forces.  With the increased size of the Adaptable Force’s Cavalry Regiments outlined here additional vehicles will need to be ordered.

A significant capability upgrade is planned for the Warrior.  380 vehicles are being upgraded as part of the Warrior Capability Sustainment Programme of which 252 could be fitted with a new powerful 40mm cannon.  A further 320 should be converted into an Armoured Battlefield Support Vehicle which would include APC and ambulance variants.  There is a need for a dedicated Guided variant of the ABSV to be armed with anti-armour missiles with a range beyond that of tank guns.  This could be a further development of Brimstone 2.  The Guided ABSV would share a datalink with UAVs, helicopters and Ajax vehicles to enable them to engage even the most powerful main battle tanks at distances beyond their offensive range.  If budgets allow 228 of these could then equip virtually all of the Guided Troops and Anti-Tank Platoons in both the Reaction and Adaptable Forces.

The Army needs to decide on a Mechanised Infantry Vehicle to replace the aged Bulldog APC and the limited Mastiff.  This should be an 8×8 wheeled vehicle such as the VBCI or Piranha V.  At the very minimum the MIV should equip three Reaction Force plus twelve regular and six reserve Infantry Battalions from the Adaptable Force.  It could eventually go on to equip all of them, if budgets allow.

VBCI-2 Image 3

The infantry needs a new Mechanised Infantry Vehicle such as the VBCI or Piranha V.

The Royal Artillery will introduce the Land Ceptor mobile surface-to-air missile to replace the Rapier and operate in partnership with the high velocity Starstreak.  The support vehicles for towed artillery, UAVs and SAMs such as Wolfhound, Warthog and Stormer are all due out of service in 2024.  These should be replaced by 328 new wheeled Common Support Vehicles, which could be a turretless variant of the Mechanised Infantry Vehicle.

Puma medium lift helicopters plus any remaining Lynx and Bell 212 assault helicopters will need replacing by the mid-2020’s with either 54 medium sized helicopters such as the NH90, AW149 or EC725 or a combination of an additional 30 Wildcats and 14 Chinooks.

It is also important that the Army trains with allied forces to ensure co-ordination of planning and maximise fighting capacity.  The Army should be prioritising joint exercises in Poland with both the Polish Army and rapid reaction units of the German and French Armies and deployment to Norway in association with the Norwegian Army and amphibious units.

The scenario analyses have been developed to show the minimum number of Armoured Regiments, Cavalry Regiments and Infantry Battalions to fulfil each task and this has informed Option 1 below.  Both Options 1 and 2 are based on the same personnel requirements as Future Force 2020.  Each additional Option offers enhanced capabilities but at extra cost and increased numbers of personnel.

Army Option 1

ORBAT:

  • Special Air Service
  • 3 Para Battalions and 1 Air Mobile Infantry Battalion
  • 50 Apache AH2s in 5 Squadrons
  • 34 Wildcat AH1s in 4 Squadrons
  • 8 Lynx AH9As in 1 Squadron
  • 54 Watchkeeper UAVs in 2 Artillery Regiments
  • Royal Marines Commandos
  • 3 Armoured Regiments
  • 6 Armoured Cavalry Regiments
  • 3 Light Cavalry Regiments (with a secondary role as Armoured Regiments)
  • 6 Armoured Infantry Battalions
  • 3 Reaction Force Mechanised Infantry Battalions
  • 12 regular Adaptable Force Mechanised Infantry Battalions
  • 6 reserve Adaptable Force Mechanised Infantry Battalions
  • 6 regular Light Protected Mobility Battalions
  • 6 reserve Light Protected Mobility Battalions
  • 24 Land Ceptor SAM launchers in 1 Artillery Regiment
  • 84 Stormer Starstreak SAM vehicles in 3 Artillery Regiments
  • 48 GMLRS rocket launchers in 1 Artillery Regiment
  • 108 AS-90 self-propelled guns in 3 Artillery Regiments
  • 120 light artillery guns in 6 Artillery Regiments
  • 60 Chinook HC4/5/6s in 4 Squadrons
  • 25 Merlin HC4s in 2 Squadrons and
  • 24 Puma HC2s in 2 Squadrons.

This Option would require ordering 1,014 Mechanised Infantry Vehicles and 4 additional Ajax specialist reconnaissance vehicles while building 207 ABSVs (180 of which would be Guided anti-armour missile carriers).

Army Option 2

As Option 1, but have Mechanised Infantry Vehicles re-equip all Adaptable Infantry Battalions.  Flexibility would be maximised by maintaining surplus Foxhound, RWMIK and Husky vehicles in storage so that in the right circumstances they could equip six regular and six reserve Light Protected Mobility Infantry Battalions.  This would enable the Army to maintain an ability to operate in urban environments and against insurgents.

British Army Foxhound Light Protected Patrol Vehicle (LPPV) in Afghanistan 06

The option to use Light Protected Mobility can be maintained by keeping Foxhound, RWMIK and Husky vehicles in storage.

This Option would require ordering 1,554 Mechanised Infantry Vehicles and 28 additional Ajax specialist reconnaissance vehicles while building 255 ABSVs (of which 228 would be Guided variants).

Army Option 3

In addition to Option 3 keep the 13 remaining Lynx AH9As in service with an additional 2 Squadrons.  All remaining Lynx helicopters will need a life extension beyond 2018 including integration of Brimstone 2 anti-armour missiles and then will later on need replacing with either extra Wildcat helicopters or a new medium sized helicopter.

This Option would require ordering 1,554 Mechanised Infantry Vehicles and 28 additional Ajax specialist reconnaissance vehicles while building 255 ABSVs (of which 228 would be Guided variants).

Army Option 4

As Option 3, but further increase the capability of the Army Air Corps by increasing the order for refurbished Apache AH2s to the full existing complement of 66 helicopters.  They would then serve in 6 Squadrons in total rather than the current 5.

This Option would require ordering the refurbishment of an additional 16 Apache AH2 helicopters as well as ordering 1,554 Mechanised Infantry Vehicles and 28 additional Ajax specialist reconnaissance vehicles while building 255 ABSVs (of which 228 would be Guided variants).

Further details;

[document url=”https://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/Army-2025.pdf” width=”600″ height=”600″]

 

The rest of the series

1 – Introduction

2 – Defence of the UK

3 – Other Sovereign Territories

4 – NATO

5 – A Southern or Middle Eastern Threat

6 – An Eastern and Northern Threat

7 – Global Intervention

8 – Land Command 2025; Appendix 1 – Army 2025

9 – Naval Command 2025; Appendix 2 – Royal Navy 2025

10 – Air Command 2025; Appendix 3 – RAF 2025

11 – Conclusion – The Options for Change; Appendix 4 – An Abundance of Riches: MoD Procurement 2015-25

14 Comments
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Grant
Grant
October 6, 2015 11:29 pm

“Amateurs talk about tactics; professionals talk about C2 then Logistics” some key enablers have been missed off, the answer is 82 000 the debate will be be the balance between Combat and Combat Support.

HMArmedForcesReview
HMArmedForcesReview
October 7, 2015 1:36 am

It is a case of “please sir, may I have some more?”

Lord Jim
Lord Jim
October 7, 2015 2:45 am

.

Whilst there is logic in your proposal, it is unfortunately so far into fantasy land that it would be more likely for the Navy to get a third Queen Elizabeth class, have them all converted to CATOBAR and 9 F-35C Squadron and 18 Hawkeyes.

On the numbers front, we are only purchasing enough Ajax variants to equip 3 Heavy Cavalry Regiments with the remainder going to the integral recce units of the Armoured and Armoured Infantry Regiments. As for the MIV, I agree we need to purchase more, but these need to remain in the Reactive Force. Speaking of the Reactive Force, this is going to be the top tier of a two tier Army from 2020. All the new toys are going to be placed here whist the Adaptive force is going to be, if it is lucky, mainly equipped with the planned MRV(P), Foxhound and Jackal. It will have legitimate roles but it is not going to be resources anything like the Reactive Force.

Under current plans and if fully funded the British Army will become the following:

ORBAT:
ARMY. (Regulars)
1 Special Air Service Regiment.
1 Special Forces Support Battalion (Parachute)
2 Parachute Infantry Battalions.
1 Air Mobile Infantry Battalion.
2 Army Air Corp Regiments (50 AH-64E Apache Guardian)
1 Army Air Corp Regiment (34 Wildcat AH1)
1 Army Air Corp Squadron (8 Lynx AH-9A)
3 Armoured Regiments. (Challenger 2)
3 Heavy Cavalry Regiments. (Ajax)
6 Armoured Infantry Regiments. (Warrior)
3 Mechanised Infantry Regiments. (MIV)
3 Light Cavalry Regiments (Jackal)
6 Light Protected Mobility Regiments (MRV(P)/Foxhound)
8 Light Roles Infantry Regiments
3 Artillery Regiments (AS90/GMLRS)
1 Artillery Regiment (105mm Light Gun)
1 Parachute Artillery Regiment (105mm Light Gun)
1 Commando Regiment (105mm Light Gun)
2 Artillery Regiments (Watch keeper)
1 Artillery Regiment (Land Ceptor/Starstreak HVM)
15 Engineering Regiments.
10 Royal Signals Regiments (+ 17 Independent Squadrons).
17 Royal Logistics Corps Regiments
Supporting the Regulars are 73 Territorial Regiments and other Reserves. Many of these no longer deploy as whole units but are linked to Regular Regiments to bring their manpower up to strength and provide replacements. There is a possibility that three of the Light Protected Mobility Regiments could be equipped with the MIV instead of the MRV(P)/Foxhound reducing the purchase of the latter two.

In addition the following ground and rotary assets should be included;

ROYAL NAVY.
3 Royal Marine Commandos
3 Fleet Air Army Squadrons (25 Merlin HC4)

ROYAL AIR FORCE.
1 Royal Air Force Regiment
4 Squadrons (60 Chinook HC4/5/6)
2 Squadrons (24 Puma HC2)

Is the above organisation ideal for the roles planned for it, No. But it is the best we can afford and we are going to have to spend our pennies carefully to achieve it. Any changes in priority in defence spending and the above organisation is unattainable. Would it be viable to reduce the Adaptive force to only 2 Light Cavalry Regiments and the 6 Light Protected Mobility Regiments. I struggle to find a real role for the 8 light Role Regiments, and if we need light Infantry we have the units within 16 Air Assault Brigade and 3 Commando Brigade.

Observer
Observer
October 7, 2015 5:28 am

@LJ

Using airborne troops for patrol is a very severe waste of capabilities, which is why you use the more “expandable” light infantry units, as nasty as it sounds. Parachute allowances are one of the more expensive allowance in the army and parachute training is expensive, which is why using them to trawl for IEDs is wasteful, you are putting an expensive unit into a position where they can suffer attrition and replacements are harder to come by than “normal” infantry.

So to put it really nastily, the role of the light infantry is to take casualties so that units like the 16AAB and 3 CDO don’t have to and can retain their effectiveness longer. Not to mention if you scatter your premium units out into penny packet pickets and patrols, you don’t have them concentrated for use when something big comes up.

Hope that helps clarify some things for you.

ArmChairCivvy
ArmChairCivvy
October 7, 2015 7:42 am

Andy,

A v good article, thank you! You have covered some points often neglected, eg. the options for and limits to regenerating capability.

In some places the transition from “planned” to aspirational is a bit unclear, but – sure – this is an opinion piece, not a statistical study. LJ’s contribution is a good cross check (he got one Light Gun rgmnt more in Regulars than I did, but that would be of roundation error magnitude.

You lean towards having reserves as formed units (which is not a bad ambition). As of today, the tank crews and Light Gun arty units train on the basis of the former to be fed into formed units as replacement/ additional crews and the latter as additional batteries (to be slotted in). Sure, in a short piece not all detail can be included, but do you have a view (and is it Black & White ie. formed units at one end of the spectrum and inserting specialists at almost individual level at the other)?

This “Integrating both regular and reserve units on a three year rotation ensures that enough of them are available for potential deployment while maximising both individual and group training.” was an interesting point, but (again) is it the current target or an aspirational statement?

Obsvr
Obsvr
October 7, 2015 8:37 am

One or two observations

Watchkeeper, is only one element of the STA regts, and it doesn’t replace Gazelle, WK is required to operate in hostile airspace, its key role in general war is TA for CB fire (the rest of the regt use CB radars for the same purpose, special OPs (also CB focussed in general war) and I think still some sound ranging which is passive and hence difficult to counter. Gazelle never goes near anything notably hostile. It’s useful to remember that arty fire is the biggest cause of casualties in general war, therefore effective countermeasures are required.

Whether the TA can ever be trained to a level that makes them immediately commitable to action in general war is somewhat debateable. Unless you want to suffer heavy casualties.

Steve Coltman
Steve Coltman
October 7, 2015 10:23 am

LJ was very dismissive of the Reserves in his comment above, not bothering to list how many infantry battalions etc. It seems a lot of regulars have a low opinion of reserves. I went to an armoured reserves conference a year ago and heard how a US Marines Reserve tank battalion had been mobilised, re-equipped with Abrams (from M-60s), sent to the 1st Gulf war, whacked a load of Iraqi T-72s and was home again in less than 6 months. We have low expectations of Reserves but as Andy says above, we have little money for Regular manpower so it is essential to make best use of the cheap manpower that the Reserves give us. Not so disdainful of them please! One other point – in the UK we use the term ‘regiment’ interchangeably with battalion, for the rest of the world Regiment = Brigade. Best to avoid using the word at all.

ArmChairCivvy
ArmChairCivvy
October 7, 2015 10:50 am
Reply to  Steve Coltman

Before bdes became substitutes for Divisions, in the Rest of the World the relative strengths stood at something like
– Rgmnt 3k
– Bde 5-7k
– Div 10-16k

Then you have aberrations when a division grew, de facto, into a Corps, e.g.
– the NZ Division (in the Med)
– or GrossDeutschland (on the Eastern Front)

JamesF
October 7, 2015 12:12 pm

. I don’t think the adaptable Lt. Cav. regiments will get Ajax. The additional turreted vehicles will go to the close recce troops in the Challenger and Warrior regiments as well the the RA joint fires (OP) units, and some battlefield surveillance teams with demountable mobile radar sets. Jackal and Coyote and RWMIK (in the yeomanry squadrons) are planned to soldier on until 2025.

The only possibility is if the Land Joint Strike concept mentioned by CGS recently creates a ‘medium brigade’, which will have an Ajax regiment. If so it will be moot whether that is a re-equipped adapatable force Lt. Cav. formation, or re-deployment of an existing 3 Div. Arm. Cav. Regt.

LTCRJM
LTCRJM
October 7, 2015 7:20 pm
Reply to  AndyC

Here is my American perspective on UK Army organization. Maybe I’m looking at this as I’m an American Army Reserve Officer and our BDEs and Divisions are pure Active or Reserve component. I believe that you have the personnel numbers to organize as listed below. By organizing as such, you can have one group deployed or for immediate action, one group in reset and one group training for deployment.

I know that your Reserve BDEs are designed not to deploy, but by adding 2 more BDE HQs to the Reserves and one more to the regulars you would be able to achieve this organization. Each DIV HQs would have 1 Armour BDE, 1 Infantry BDE and an additional BDE that can be task organized with a Para BN, an AA BN and a RM Commando. The Reserve BDEs can deploy every other deployment with the DIV HQ (1 of the 2 BDEs deploying at a time) or bits and pieces as needed.

REGULAR ARMY
3 DIVISION HQS: (Each with 1 Armour BDE, 1 Infantry BDE, 1 “Specialty” BDE (i.e. 16 BDE, 24 BDE or 3 CDO BDE (RM)), 2 Reserve BDEs)

1 ARMOUR BDE: (2 ARMOUR INF & 1 MECH INF BNS; 1 ARMOUR REG; 1 ARMOUR CAVALRY REG, 1 SP ARTY REG)
12 ARMOUR BDE: (2 ARMOUR INF & 1 MECH INF BNS; 1 ARMOUR REG; 1 ARMOUR CAVALRY REG, 1 SP ARTY REG)
20 ARMOUR BDE: (2 ARMOUR INF & 1 MECH INF BNS; 1 ARMOUR REG; 1 ARMOUR CAVALRY REG, 1 SP ARTY REG)
4 BDE: (3 LIGHT INF BNS; 1 LIGHT ARTY REG; 1 LIGHT CAVALRY SQUADRON)
7 BDE: (3 LIGHT INF BNS; 1 LIGHT ARTY REG; 1 LIGHT CAVALRY SQUADRON)
51 BDE: (3 LIGHT INF BNS; 1 LIGHT ARTY REG; 1 LIGHT CAVALRY SQUADRON)
16 BDE: (3 PARA INF BN; 1 LIGHT ARTY REG; 1 LIGHT CAVALRY SQUADRON)
24 BDE: (3 AIR ASSAULT INF BN; 1 LIGHT ARTY REG; 1 LIGHT CAVALRY SQUADRON)

2 LIGHT INFANTRY BNS: LONDON PUBLIC DUTIES (Bring back 56 BDE?)
2 LIGHT INFANTRY BNS: CYPRUS (Create a BDE HQ?)
1 LIGHT INFANTRY BN (GURKA): BRUNEI
1 PARA INFANTRY BN: JSFSG

ARMY RESERVE
11 BDE: (1 MECH INF BN; 1 LIGHT INF BN; 1 LIGHT CAVALRY SQUADRON; 1 LIGHT ARTY BATTERY)
19 BDE: (1 MECH INF BN; 1 LIGHT INF BN; 1 LIGHT CAVALRY SQUADRON; 1 LIGHT ARTY BATTERY)
38 (Irish) BDE: (1 MECH INF BN; 1 LIGHT INF BN; 1 LIGHT CAVALRY SQUADRON; 1 LIGHT ARTY BATTERY)
42 BDE: (1 MECH INF BN; 1 LIGHT INF BN; 1 LIGHT CAVALRY SQUADRON; 1 LIGHT ARTY BATTERY)
52 (Scottish) BDE: (1 MECH INF BN; 1 LIGHT INF BN; 1 LIGHT CAVALRY SQUADRON; 1 LIGHT ARTY BATTERY)
160 (Welsh) BDE: (1 MECH INF BN; 1 LIGHT INF BN; 1 LIGHT CAVALRY SQUADRON; 1 LIGHT ARTY BATTERY)

Lord Jim
Lord Jim
October 7, 2015 7:40 pm


Each Armoured and Armoured Infantry Regiment with have a Recce Unit of 8 Ajax. In addition each of these units will replace any Spartan and Sultan CVR(T)s used now instead of FV432 variants with the respective Ajax variants. This will account for roughly 110 platforms if the CVR(T)s are replaced on a one for one basis. Each of the three Armoured Cavalry Regiments is going to be equipped with between 70 and 90 Ajax variants depending on whether they have 3 or 4 Sabre Squadrons each. That adds up to between 210 and 270 platforms which brings the total to between 320 and 380 Ajax of all types. Once you add it the vehicles used to replace some of the Fv432s and CVR(T) in Engineering and Signals Regiments you have on a few left to put in storage as a reserve. There might be a radical restructuring of Army Formations between now and 2025 but I doubt it even if it is necessary to get the most out of the Army.

@Observer.
My point is that using Light Role Infantry as walking targets on patrol is no longer acceptable to both the public and Politicians. As a result their use is on the whole a waste of manpower. I was not suggesting using either our Airmobile or Commando Infantry in this role but rather in the specialised roles where light infantry have their uses still ie Norway.

@Steve Coltman
The breakdown of Territorial Units is as follows;
Armour 5 Regiments
Royal Artillery 7 Regiments
Royal Engineers 5 Regiments
Infantry 14 Battalions
Special Air Service 3 Regiments
Signals 5 Regiments
Equipment Support 2 battalions
Logistics 16 Regiments
Adjutant General’s Office 2 Regiments (MPs)
Intelligence Corps 2 Battalions
Aviation 1 Regiment
Medical 15 Units

What is important is the UK no longer deploys its reserve as whole units but has rather partnered each regular battalions with a Reserve. For example the 1st Battalion Royal Anglian Regiment is teamed with the 3rd Battalion Princess of Wales’s Regiment (R). The same goes for the Armoured Regiments and so on. There role is to provide the personnel to both fill out the regular Regiment and provide replacements, especially in the Adaptive Force. Within the Reactive Force, most units are already at full strength do it is mainly in the support Regiments that this partnering with reserves is being used. As a result most Reserve units no longer have a full compliment of equipment as they had in the days of the Cold War. For example the Royal Yeomanry no longer operate their own AFVs but train with that of their partner unit.