MoD Public Relations and Communications

Brought to use courtesy of PR week is the news that the MoD is looking at restructuring its public relations and communications operation

[browser-shot width=”600″ url=”http://www.prweek.com/article/1293459/armed-forces-comms-set-radical-change-mod-leads-rethink”]

A key paragraph

He expressed hope the review would lead to the 120-strong MoD comms team, which already functions as a directorate, having greater control over wider armed forces communications, on which an estimated 500 people work

Meanwhile

A new low in the trivialising of defence matters.

If I hear one more time about how many sodding double decker buses can fit inside a QE my head is going to explode :)

 

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Engineer Tom
Engineer Tom
May 27, 2014 11:35 am

An interesting fact about the Army’s media relations team is that they have a large TA element with members of the media within it, an example was the former head of media relations in Afghanistan was a Sky News producer who within weeks of the end of her deployment was returning to work in Kabul for Sky.

I wonder how they mitigate against conflicts of interest.

Chris
Chris
May 27, 2014 12:13 pm

TD – ref how many double decker buses can fit inside a QE – this is important stuff – for example are the reporters using the 1960 Standard Bus Unit (SBU) or the 2014 Standard Bus Unit which is of course bigger being 34% longer? Imagine the hoohar if the big carriers were spec’d to carry X number of 2014 SBUs but the designers used the traditional 1960 SBU standard instead and thus the carriers would need to be lengthened 34% to be compliant? Therefore it is absolutely vital to define exactly which SBU is being referenced.

Non-defence but quite interesting – Borisbus is as stated above 34% longer than Routemaster, and has hybrid electric drive that allows the diesel engine to fit under the stairs at the back corner, and has fewer seats fitted to allow more standing room, and yet carries just 16 more passengers (80 vs 64) despite an extra 2.85m length on each deck. By comparison when Routemaster was lengthened by 500mm (ish) another 8 passengers fitted – this is rational; one more row of two seats each side of the walkway on two decks. Considering the Routmaster had its engine filling the front of the lower deck and Borisbus doesn’t, it shows how inefficient the packaging of passengers now is. Maybe the politically correct lobby insist there should be no discrimination against overweight people and more space per passenger was mandated?

Observer
Observer
May 27, 2014 12:25 pm

Chris, it’s a pity we’re no longer on the mocca/latte system, that so deserved a thumbs up. Made my day. :)

IXION
May 27, 2014 12:55 pm

TO

Sorry but as an all singing all dancing Elephant able to carry absolutely every thing that any sane armed forces could ever require:- It is vital that Nelly is able to carry double decker buses.

After all surely the classic Routemaster will be fres SV! Rebuilt and up armoured. It’s just about big enough, uses commercial components, and is not only just about the only vehicle that has not yet been tested; it’s probably younger than some of the ones that have!

After all its not like the British army does not have form with double decker buses………

Phil
May 27, 2014 12:58 pm

Bring back the latte/mocha regime!!

Sir Humphrey
May 27, 2014 3:55 pm

In my experience a genuinely professional bunch of service personnel and civilians who do a very difficult and thankless job to a high standard of professionalism. I have a lot of time for the DMC team, who get that they have challenging, often hugely controversial messages to get across, but they do so with good humour and work with the material they have.

TAS
TAS
May 27, 2014 4:43 pm

You said it Sir H – and they’re set to get even busier in future as they are brought fully home into the very earliest levels of operational and strategic planning, as opposed to having to react to events after they have happened.

Craig
Craig
May 27, 2014 5:45 pm

The Boris Bus has three doors and two staircases, compared to 1 each respectively on the Routemaster, so that’s a lot of lost space for passengers. The other big difference to vintage models is having a space for a wheelchair.