Lost on deck 8, there’s an app for that

Lost on deck 8, dry your eyes, just tap your phone screen.

Is it just me, or do the dark blue continually set themselves up for piss taking?

Crew members are shortly to be given a special app for their mobile phones to help them navigate around the ship.

How very down with the kids.

I am going to indulge in a spot of ill informed look before you leap comment and ask…

At what point in ‘double the projected budget Project CVF’ did those in charge think, I know what would be a good idea, lets have an app for Matelots who can’t find their way around their ship?

OK, I know the app might be free, it might be a temporary measure, it might work perfectly well regardless of the handsets charge state or whether the ship is full f smoke, it might include other ships functions and of course, it might be 100% secure because pissed up sailors on shore leave losing mobiles in brothels is such a remote possibility not to worry about!

Wonder if it is available for iOS and Android?

Read more here

 

 

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All Politicians are the Same
All Politicians are the Same
January 15, 2014 5:57 pm

Learning your way instinctively around a Ship is absoloutely vital. It aids in responses to FF/DC, response to intruders etc. Remember that the compartment custodian or department representative will not always be available, especially when only the Duty Watch are available alomgside.
A Submariner learns to trace every system and valve before they get their Dolphins. Knowledge of your Ship increases operational efficiency, the ability to visualise a smoke filled compartment or work out another route saves lives.
Annything that allows this knowledge to be gained more quickly is a win.

Chris
Chris
January 15, 2014 6:04 pm

Absolutely priceless! What a brilliant invention! While tied to the dock with hatches & doors open the app will allow the new crewmembers to become as dependant on this quasi-satnag as no doubt they are on real satnag when driving. Once at sea with all the hatches & doors locked shut? No more mobile signal… Lots of lost personnel traumatized by the loss of their pocket-friend, wandering grey corridors aimlessly.

x
x
January 15, 2014 6:17 pm

What’s needed is some sort of system for numbering and labelling decks, compartments, flats, and spaces. Perhaps decks could be numbered? You know like 1 downwards. And decks above the hull could be 01, 02 or something. Then spaces could be lettered, perhaps starting with A at the pointy end and working back aft………

I am off to write a letter to the RN now. Just need to find my quill and parchment…….

Engineer Tom
Engineer Tom
January 15, 2014 6:24 pm

Even alongside in a T23 as soon as you get properly inside you tend to lose signal. Also the whole point of NBCD markings is they are simple to follow i.e. if you know what location marking you need to get to by reading the markings on the doors etc. you will find it, it is all very simple, the issue is knowing what location each compartment is in, for that they tend to have layouts dotted around in main passageways especially in DC command posts, so find one of them, simple.

Engineer Tom
Engineer Tom
January 15, 2014 6:28 pm

@ x

All very simple isn’t it, a basic intro to things like you need to go up to the DC deck to go past WT bulkheads etc, and they should be able to figure out the rest themselves.

Mark
Mark
January 15, 2014 6:39 pm

Will it have to be switched off as they near the flight deck? Mobile phone signals affect aircraft operations according to aircraft operators in the uk anyway don’t you know.

Wouldnt worry about leaving them lying in pubs ashore given there ability to let people walk off with bits of radar I’m sure you could pop dwn to Portsmouth and cart a few off.

x
x
January 15, 2014 7:12 pm

@ Engineer Tom

I can see it now,

“No Smith Z doesn’t mean zombie proof…….”

Anixtu
Anixtu
January 15, 2014 7:16 pm

Now that the outrage bus is rolling along at speed, are we all sure that the reporting is 100% accurate and that this app is actually aimed at the ship’s company and not the dockyard workers, contractors and sub-contractors working onboard during the build and fitting out?

You might like to read page 6 of Issue 11 (Winter 2013) of “Carrier Waves”, the ACA newsletter and one of the top hits when you search for “queen elizabeth aircraft carrier app” to fact check the story. :-)

x
x
January 15, 2014 7:24 pm

@ Anixtu

Are you saying dockies are a bit thick? :)

SomewhatRemoved
SomewhatRemoved
January 15, 2014 9:02 pm

I am holding my head in my hands. Really?? FFS the deck plan is on the back of most heads doors!

Who authored this report – Red Trousers as a spoof?

Engineer Tom
Engineer Tom
January 15, 2014 9:32 pm

Interesting only one paper is actually reporting it as news

WiseApe
January 15, 2014 10:20 pm

Guide dogs? Now there’s adaptable.

Red Trousers
Red Trousers
January 15, 2014 10:27 pm

@ SR,

I don’t recall authoring this, spoof or not. As far as I’m concerned (with the princely total of 2 months “on” Bristol while she did the Dartmouth summer cruise in the Baltic in the late 80s, my role being to be the gritty infantry officer that an RM Lt should have done (and I was a Cavalryman, but the Andrew might not have known any difference), but who broke his leg before the deployment), the SOP should be:

1. Don’t even think about kipping below the waterline, as the Captain will be a complete nutter who wants to crash the boat into an unfeasibly large rock.

2. If unavoidably below the waterline while on duty, carefully observe the green emergency signs with the running man symbol. Only follow the arrows pointing diagonally upwards, not those pointing downwards. Do this at any immediate “graunching” sound or any glances between matelots with furrowed brows. Do not wait to be told.

3. If in a lifeboat, immediately by physical force eject any young Andrew with gold on his sleeve who might think he might take command. The little sod is probably somewhere along the blame chain that caused you to be in the lifeboat to start with.

4. Follow the seagulls in your lifeboat. They normally indicate the way to shore.

5. Conduct a fighting recce patrol immediately on reaching the shore, as it might not be friendly.

;)

dave haine
dave haine
January 15, 2014 10:52 pm

@RT
Aah…Still the voice of reason…

Wouldn’t the sound of ipods being disconnected also be a clue?

SomewhatRemoved
SomewhatRemoved
January 15, 2014 11:35 pm

Ah but RT, it’s so much more fun to have esteemed guests such as yourself on the Bridge when we mention to the Captain in an over-loud voice ‘Sir, shipping report, at red 40 I have a CONTACT!’ and watch them hit the deck. ;-)

martin
Editor
January 16, 2014 12:55 am

Don’t forget just how big this ship is and while the permanent crew should certainly be familiar with it the visiting marines, air group and other’s may not. I think this is a great idea. How many days training can be saved over the 50 year life of these two vessels with a simple app.

Security may be a bit of an issue but I seriously doubt the app will contain any vital information for an enemy.

SomewhatRemoved
SomewhatRemoved
January 16, 2014 2:36 am

Well lets face it, the Chinese operators of the Goliath crane have seen every bit being slotted together so far…

Anixtu
Anixtu
January 16, 2014 9:12 am

RT,

“3. If in a lifeboat…”

Which lifeboat were you assigned to on Bristol?

Mike
Mike
January 16, 2014 9:47 am

When I joined Illustrious in 1984 I was given a little blue book with fold out pages, one for each deck to help me learn my way around. So the navy has done a modern version. Big yawn.

mikey-boi
mikey-boi
January 16, 2014 10:05 am

As others have said, SHIP KNOWLEDGE saves your and your shipmates life. There are no substitutes. Knowledge must be intrinsic, with mnemonics, rules of thumb etc it has to be rote.

I still remember stuff from my CVS days like “2 – 5 HELPS”. e.g 2 and 5 Deck are continuous, Hotel, Echo, Lima,Papa, Sierra are the Ladder chains. As well as hundreds of other little elements which allows you to make decisions, especially if Main broadcast is telling you there is a fire in PAPA section and you are in Sierra you know you’ve got one way out!

You don’t have time to open your smart phone open an APP and orientate yourself. Practical, pragmatic and instinctive procedures save lives. Technology fails, but as long as you are functioning and equipped with knowledge you can function and save lives.

FOST should p*ss on this idea from a great height, it undermines the argument for knowing your ships inside out.

Zaitsev
Zaitsev
January 16, 2014 10:05 am

@Mark @Engineer Tom. The Mobile phone signal will not be a problem as they will simply download the app while alongside in a port. The problem will be the GPS signal which the will lose as soon as they go down below. However my Dad claims (although it may well be a lie) that they used to navigate using maps without GPS (think it had something to do with sextants and chronometers or something).

Anixtu
Anixtu
January 16, 2014 11:21 am

As the clueless commentary continues, I see I am going to have to provide as easy and direct a link as I can to the “mythbusting” original story:

http://www.aircraftcarrieralliance.co.uk/~/media/Files/A/Aircraft-Carrier-Alliance/Attachments/publication-and-speeches/carrier-waves-winter-2013.pdf

See page 6

An interesting insight into Google rankings – since I posted about this newsletter yesterday it has climbed from 5th or 6th in the search rankings for the search terms used up to 1st place. Well done Think Defence readers!

Explicitly:

1) This app is for personnel working on a ship under construction, not for the Royal Navy crew of a vessel in service.
2) It uses QR codes posted on bulkheads to identify location, not GPS.

For those with a little service knowledge, what makes you think all the location markings are in place on a vessel at this stage of construction?

SomewhatRemoved
SomewhatRemoved
January 16, 2014 11:27 am

Anixtu, most of the pre-fabricated sections are virtually complete when they are shipped out, so I expect them to have everything including location markings already – certainly this was the case when I had a look around DRGN just after the bow had been welded on.

Anixtu
Anixtu
January 16, 2014 11:33 am

My experience is a little more variable. No doubt some markings are in place, but others may not be, or may be obscured. For a start, look at the megaboard on the bulkhead in the photo accompanying the article.

Engineer Tom
Engineer Tom
January 16, 2014 11:34 am

Just noticed the pennant number of the T45 in the image on the original artice D23, wow when did we revamp HMS Bristol.

Anixtu
Anixtu
January 16, 2014 11:36 am

TD,

It’s not the pisstaking that’s a problem, it’s Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells hopping on the outrage bus to bemoan the decline of ship knowledge in today’s Royal Navy as evidenced by the iPod generation needing an app to find their way around their ship when back in the day all DTW had was a ball of string or some biscuit crumbs.

Dunservin
Dunservin
January 16, 2014 11:40 am

Even as a piss-take, there still seems to be some confusion about the purpose, functionality and intended users of this app which can be downloaded in a variety of ways and doesn’t depend on having ‘a signal’ to work. Here is the original article from the ACA Newsletter:

http://www.aircraftcarrieralliance.co.uk/~/media/Files/A/Aircraft-Carrier-Alliance/Attachments/publication-and-speeches/carrier-waves-winter-2013.pdf?

Engineers have devised an ingenious solution for safely navigating through HMS Queen Elizabeth

Imagine walking into a building 15 storeys high, with more than 3,000 rooms. Most of the corridors look similar and there is no receptionist to guide you or even any windows to help you get your bearings. How do you find the room you need to be in?

Welcome to the newest challenge with working onboard a huge and almost complete HMS Queen Elizabeth. But now a team of engineers has devised an ingenious app-based solution to this very particular problem.

Integration Support Engineer Phil Applegate explained: “HMS Queen Elizabeth is large and complex and, with lots of work in progress, finding exactly the room you need to be in can be quite challenging, particularly for people who are new to the ship. “Satnav wouldn’t work on the ship, but by loading a custom-designed programme with chematics of the ships, we have created our own navigation app specific to the QE Class.”

Users scan one of many QR codes posted throughout the ship with a mobile phone handset. This tells them where they are and can create a route to take them exactly where they need to be.

Phil said: “We have configured the app to use only safe routes and, just like a normal satnav, if one route is closed it can quickly calculate another. “When it is up and running, this system will reduce the time spent navigating around the ship searching for the right compartment, and will also ensure workers don’t stray into areas that may be hazardous.”

Zaitsev
Zaitsev
January 16, 2014 11:41 am

@Anixtu a ball of string or some biscuit crumbs? Pure luxury in my day they poked out both our eyes and made us walk around the ship backwards!

DavidNiven
DavidNiven
January 16, 2014 11:42 am

“We have configured the app to use only safe routes and, just like a normal satnav, if one route is closed it can quickly calculate another. “When it is up and running, this system will reduce the time spent navigating around the ship searching for the right compartment, and will also ensure workers don’t stray into areas that may be hazardous.”

That’s just health and safety gone mad! ;-)

Engineer Tom
Engineer Tom
January 16, 2014 11:59 am

It will also create the hazard of people looking at their phone and not where they are going, also they will have to make it clear to all users that before entering a compartment, they still check to make sure there aren’t no entry signs etc, as if you say the app is correct and then it isn’t updated regularly enough, someone could walk into a compartment they weren’t meant to be in and get injured, they will then be able to claim that the ACA’s system was at fault rather than them ignoring a sign on a door.

DavidNiven
DavidNiven
January 16, 2014 12:04 pm

‘It will also create the hazard of people looking at their phone and not where they are going’

Really? they are going to be staring at their phone the whole time they are walking or are they going to glance at their phone when they come to a change in direction?

Is this what the UK is coming to, people adding a layer of hazard and safe guards rather than blessing tradesmen with common sense?

Brian Black
Brian Black
January 16, 2014 12:09 pm

We have vision-based augmented reality on mobile devices already. An augmented reality app for the Navy could allow sailors to see what their big empty aircraft carrier would look like if it was actually full of aircraft.

These sort of commonly available phone apps are an important step towards the kind of technology that we could well see onboard the Navy’s ships in the near future.

Augmented reality and synthetic vision has been put forward as an aid to firefighters, allowing them to see visualizations of their surroundings in dense smoke, surrounding and spot temperatures, as well as displaying info from their own equipment and health monitoring. One development company is NKE inc. at novemberkiloecho.com .

So successor tech to the novelty apps that you can get on your phone today could be very useful for the Navy, and military generally, in future.

Red Trousers
Red Trousers
January 16, 2014 8:30 pm

@ Anixtu,

“Which lifeboat were you assigned to on Bristol?”

I don’t recall, it was about half way back on the right hand side (muster point).

But we did do several (quite a few) drills, and the Dartmouth cadets were given a really serious introduction to damage control and related procedures. It was incredibly professional by the ship’s complement, especially by the Petty Officers. Really good stuff, as all joking aside, everyone would expect from the Royal Navy and there was no chance at all of it being done in a slipshod manner.

x
x
January 16, 2014 8:47 pm

Does the Golden Rivet have a QR code?

Red Trousers
Red Trousers
January 16, 2014 9:23 pm

@ X,

Thankfully I was grown up enough to not fall for the Golden Rivet canard. I think that every service probably has its’ equivalent. I can recall on the Squadron Tank Park new Troopers being sent off to the QM(Technical) stores department for a long weight to fix some imagined engine problem. “Aye lad, stand over there, we’ll get you one right after the current job”. Or being told to pump up the CVR(T) track hydraulic tension by pumping the wing mirror arm with mirror removed… Keep them going most of the morning with that one.

Presumably the Kevins have similar.

SomewhatRemoved
SomewhatRemoved
January 16, 2014 10:13 pm

Maybe we should get this app for those Google glasses.

RT – bucket of steam, pot of tartan paint and my all time favourite, charging up the emergency glow in the dark strips (complete with foulie jacket to ‘concentrate the output of the torch). Oh, and asking for the Buffer’s test tackles.

Ace Rimmer
February 12, 2014 12:11 pm

I with Anonymous on this one, damn, I should put more effort into my comments, on reflection mine seem so dry and emotionless…

…and TD, I love your passionate writing so much too! ;-)