3 PARA Sharpen Chemical Attack Response

The use of chemical weapons in Syria has been a timely reminder of the kind of training British troops might need to protect themselves in a war zone.

And as 3 PARA prepares to become the UK’s high readiness Airborne Task Force – those skills are being perfected, for deployment at short notice anywhere in the world.

 

 

 

14 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
wf
wf
December 16, 2013 9:11 am

Good to hear….although I suspect the chances are that the first UK forces member to encounter CW or BW will be based in the UK, not in our super duper reaction forces :-(

Chris Werb
Chris Werb
December 16, 2013 11:36 am

Remind me why we got rid of our protected CBRN recce cabability again?

Not sure how you’re meant to achieve a cheek-weld with a weapon wearing one of those respirators.

Chris
Chris
December 16, 2013 12:19 pm

Chris W – found a picture on the web of a soldier trying to shoot while wearing the GSR mask – head tipped at some 30 degrees it appeared so the gun rested in the notch between filter canister and ear. Did not look comfortable.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/05/Soldier_Wearing_GSR_General_Service_Respirator_MOD_45154423.jpg/1024px-Soldier_Wearing_GSR_General_Service_Respirator_MOD_45154423.jpg

a
a
December 16, 2013 5:17 pm

Remind me why we got rid of our protected CBRN recce cabability again?

Because the last member of the British armed forces to actually have been attacked with chemical weapons died some years ago aged about 102?

Phil
December 16, 2013 5:25 pm

Thank God I got out before all that CBRN bollocks kicked off again.

A ball-ache carrying that shit around and trying to get your CBRN boots into your rocket pouches with your CBRN smock with a spoon and tears.

As for cheek weld – if you’re operating in that sort of environment really there’s bigger issues than getting a good grouping.

CBRNGuru
CBRNGuru
December 16, 2013 6:03 pm


Think you are slightly out of touch Phil, the only thing that makes CBRN shit is the personnel who have not got a clue about what they are doing, which includes 3 Para. I have trained plenty of them over the last 8 months. This consent insistence of wearing IPE when there is no need to, still trying to get their thick minds out of the cold war crap.
The chances of a 122mm rocket or artillery barrage over a square kilometer has disappeared forever, unless we decide to pick on North Korea, nobody has that capability anymore. It all about finding TIM (Toxic Industrial Materials) that may be used in a haphazard way.
@ Chris Werb
The CBRN AS&C Squadron will be Falcon Squadron from the RTR. They will be using FUCHs and be located at Harlem Lines in Warminster, taking over the location from A Squadron 1RTR. The Demonstration Squadron will now be a rotational duty by the three Armoured Regiments in Tidworth.
The CBRN AS&C Squadron will be a Divisional asset controlled by the Army, because they are paying for it, so a finger up to the CBRN Defence Wing…. So much for Tri-service working… 

Phil
December 16, 2013 6:12 pm

Think you are slightly out of touch Phil

I’m talking about the added weight and embuggerance and bulk of carrying the kit and the simple pleasures of your respirator haversack and noddy suit packing. My comment has no deeper meaning than that. But CBRN is definitely shit.

CBRNGuru
CBRNGuru
December 16, 2013 6:31 pm


You are probably right Phil, CBRN has a marmite effect on people.

But it’s an insurance capability for the military, not really been used to great effect since WW1, the odd little bit here and there. Trouble is, having nothing and something happens then like the snatch Landrover episode all hell breaks loose and people want to sue the MOD left, right and centre. So best the guys have the gear just in case along with all the other CBRN capability, just in case…..

As I said it is less and less of a major threat, just a pain in the arse for the patrol or platoon that either comes across a toxic find or someone that has wired up some chemical shells to explosives. And there are plenty of chemical shells out there… plenty of talk about sorting out Syria, pity they did not do that in Libya, because that’s leaking CBW like a sieve at the moment.

Phil
December 16, 2013 6:42 pm

I completely agree CBRN needs to stay firmly on the radar.

And personally I think Syria showed how quickly a decent sized state controlled CW capability can get in your grid again. I know my mates still in had some fairly major modifications to their normal jogging training programmes to ++ CBRN drills when things were getting tense. I don’t know how much of that was pushed from upon high and how much was local initiative. But it was all of a sudden popping up again. And its a capability we’re bloody good at and we should certainly not throw away an advantage that like heavy warfare would take a very long time re-generate – certainly slower than it would a state to develop a practical wide area CW capability even from a standing start.

dave haine
dave haine
December 16, 2013 6:50 pm

@ wf
I would say that the first person to encounter CW or BW, will be a Fireman…which is why BA (breathing apparatus) is obligatory now for all turn-outs, and if a chemical hazard is suspected, the whole hazmat truck is turned out, and firemen have to wear the astonishing sweaty-knacker suit, or hazmat suit.

@ Phil
Amen to that….

a
a
December 17, 2013 10:38 am

It all about finding TIM (Toxic Industrial Materials) that may be used in a haphazard way.

A new acronym! :)

But, yes, this makes a lot of sense. I remember hearing a horror story about an infantry company in Bosnia that basha’d up in an old metal works. Turns out that they had been using a r/a source to check their welds through radiography, and when the plant had been looted the looters had dumped the source in a filing cabinet… next to which a couple of the lads subsequently unrolled their sleeping bags. Bad news for them.

The chances of a 122mm rocket or artillery barrage over a square kilometer has disappeared forever, unless we decide to pick on North Korea, nobody has that capability anymore.

This also. North Korea is about the only state that has CW and isn’t busy destroying them (plus possibly Israel). But then again it doesn’t take very long to produce a low-quality CW arsenal. Look how fast we managed it in the First World War. I would imagine that if you can make your own artillery shells, you can probably make your own CW shells as well, and the agent itself is not difficult to produce either.

CBRNGuru
CBRNGuru
December 17, 2013 1:41 pm

Ah yes @a, any good military doctrine publication has a plethora of acronyms and CBRN is no exception, you can add these ones for starters:
TIC, TIB, TIR, ALARP, RNP, ARDD, INWAT, CMP, MDS, MWS, DEPU and so on and so on…..

As for the “little incident” you mention, the isotopes were in wooden crates that they placed their sleeping bags on, so they slept on top of them.
Got the pictures the Canadian troops took after they went in when the Brits had left, their Radiac instruments alarmed when they went near the crates, so when they opened them up they found the isotopes.

Chris Werb
Chris Werb
December 18, 2013 1:43 pm

If the decision to retire the Fuchs has been rescinded I’m delighted. The withdrawal had definitely been announced at one stage.