Who the f*ck designed those seat covers

A few nice videos from the Royal Navy on the recent Trident test firing

 

Brilliantly calm and professional, but seriously, two questions for the dark blue…

Those seat covers, what sort of fevered imagination thought they were a good idea, they are so last season?

And why is the main man wearing half a Rubics cube on his head?

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wf
wf
October 30, 2012 9:19 am

I suppose it’s a reflection of the size of the V class that the ejection of a 58 tonne missile and backfill with multiple tonnes of seawater is barely noticeable!

Phil
October 30, 2012 9:31 am

You’d think there’d be good interior design. In the Navy!

x
x
October 30, 2012 11:17 am

You haven’t spent much time in RN wardrooms have you TD? :)

@ wf re size of the V-boat

Makes you think they almost planned it to be like that don’t it? :)

Shooting a missile is no different from shooting a rifle. To hit the target a steady stance is needed. Where the projectile comes from is nearly as important as the target. Something some here with their dual purpose SS(B)Ns should consider……….

B A
B A
October 30, 2012 12:49 pm

Marco Ramius wouldn’t be seen dead in there would he?

twecky
twecky
October 30, 2012 12:53 pm

if the whole ship-boat-thing is designed to do this then ergonomically the main man (Cap’n Rubik ?) is all over th eplace. i know he’s under a bit more pressure than I ever was in my mil career but he is bobbing all over the place trying to see what is going on and stay in reach of his 1930’s GPO telephone. Why can’t he speak to mission control via his headset ?

Paul R
Paul R
October 30, 2012 12:55 pm

The v boats seem pretty big! Great videos as well.

x
x
October 30, 2012 1:06 pm

Bobbing up and down is a fundamental skill even in today’s Royal Navy.

ewaste
ewaste
October 30, 2012 4:39 pm

I’d have a stab that Capt’n Rubiks has either put his Rubiks cube there for safekeeping or it’s there so it’s easy to identify the captain or something like that?

Brian
Brian
October 30, 2012 5:12 pm

I think ewaste’s got the right answer – three yellow stripes on DJ Armageddon’s shoulder boards match the three on his headphones – can’t have ear germ swapping on a three month underwater patrol, can we?

TrT
TrT
October 30, 2012 10:06 pm

F=MA

Or F/M=A in this case

The force (missile launch is constant)
Since we now the Astute and Vanguard weights (roughly) 7400 and 15900.

We can guestimate the acceleration on the Astute will be 2.14 times that seen on the Vanguard.

Since a “combined” sub would be, closer to, lets say, 10,000 tonnes, we get 1.49 times the acceleration

Either number is certainly viable.
The First world war Germans had 65 shell sizes for the Paris gun, each shot wore away about 0.5mm of the barrel.

x
x
October 30, 2012 10:17 pm

@ TrT

Interesting stuff.

Go and have a look at Polaris and the R-boats and then compare that system to Trident and the V-boats and tell me what you notice.

Opinion3
Opinion3
October 30, 2012 10:36 pm

Is that the blue screen of death I see in the background?

Mike
Mike
October 30, 2012 11:05 pm

well, they are old boats as well… even on the ‘sharp’ end, old kit remains.

I had to cringe when the guy who whooped at the thing lifting off…

@ x

Another naval Q for you regarding keeping her steady, what if ‘the call’ came in a heavy sea state? These tests are always under good conditions. That goes for all our arms tests at sea.

As with the modified ‘pieces to signify rank/whos who, often done with aircrews and control tower personnel as well.

TrT
TrT
October 30, 2012 11:06 pm

X
Missiles one quarter the weight in subs half the weight of current?

Hmmm, maybe Trident/Vanguard is pushing it already, since its considerably lighter than the ohio.

x
x
October 31, 2012 12:19 am

@ Mike

I have never thought about that! Um. Swells do affect boats. I imagine deterrent patrols are conducted nearer the boat’s safety limit than the surface. Deep means calmer. I suppose the captain keeps the boat as ready for launching as possible which would mean, I suppose, him keeping the boat in calm (it is late I can’t think of a better word) water. If the Atlantic in winter can be considered calm. Armageddon would have to wait until the boat reached suitable water.

@ TrT

And the submarine’s beam and the missile’s length are roughly the same which means the submarine form is roughly tubular which means water pressure is more even spread. And water passing over the hull does so more efficiently. Look at Astute and look Trident and then wonder how efficient an Astute carrying Trident would be. Submarines roll. Consider what Mike has just been wondering about too. So it is not only size, but shape, and displacement too.

Chuck Hill
October 31, 2012 12:58 am

At least everything is not pea green.

x
x
October 31, 2012 12:42 pm

@ Chuck Hill

So tell us about USCG staterooms, what hideous fabric adorns them? :)

Alan Garner
Alan Garner
October 31, 2012 2:30 pm

I heard a US accent in the background, is that the guy who gives the ok from Washington for the UK to use it’s “independent” nuclear deterrent?

x
x
October 31, 2012 2:59 pm

That’s the translator.

Peter Elliott
October 31, 2012 3:04 pm

Presumably they were firing on a US missile range, so that was the range control guy or whatever.

All Politicians are The same
All Politicians are The same
October 31, 2012 3:10 pm

AG

I heard a US accent in the background, is that the guy who gives the ok from Washington for the UK to use it’s “independent” nuclear deterrent?

Ever heard of range control? Probably not.

Fedaykin
October 31, 2012 8:00 pm

All British Trident DASO launches have an American observers on-board as per the treaty which allowed us to buy into the missiles. All American Trident DASO launches have British observers on-board as well.

Chuck Hill
November 1, 2012 10:27 pm

@x says:October 31, 2012 at 12:42

“@ Chuck Hill, So tell us about USCG staterooms, what hideous fabric adorns them? :)”

Two of the four ships I served on dated back to WWII and they both had pea green paint on all the bulkheads and overheads. No imagination at all, and all the upholstery was brown or green vinyl.

The ships built in the 60s were a huge improvement.

John Hartley
John Hartley
November 1, 2012 11:33 pm

I wondered what happened to my old bedroom curtains. Never thought the RN had rummaged through my bin, to recycle them on their seats.

x
x
November 1, 2012 11:54 pm

@ Chuck

Pea green? Calming I bet. :)

@ John H

:)

Chuck Hill
November 2, 2012 4:27 am

@x says: November 1, 2012 at 23:54

“@ Chuck, Pea green? Calming I bet. :)

1982-84 I was assigned a ship that had entered service in 1936–400 pound steam. One night, watching WWII movie “Wing and a Prayer” (1944) I realized I was sitting in a chair identical to the one Don Ameche was sitting in.

x
x
November 2, 2012 8:46 am

@ Chuck Hill

:)

SteveD
SteveD
November 3, 2012 9:07 am

With regards to the American; remember these things are test-fired in American ranges. We don’t have a Naval range big enough in the UK to test-fire Trident.

(remember you need an empty body of water big enough to catch this thing as it comes down, and you also need to retrieve as much as the remains as possible to prevent other nations getting a peak at the technology)

Alien8ted
Alien8ted
November 3, 2012 2:53 pm

Don’t knock the seat covers; they were selected by a large team of highly paid MOD civil servants. All got bonuses for a “job well done”, too.

The captain is quite short, and possibly insecure, hence the Rubik’s cube repeating his epaulettes up above, for all to see.