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    • Red Trousers on The SA80 A2 is “perfect” for the Army, but not Royal MarinesKent, In the run up to GW1, we were issued with some 9mm Parabellum from some civvy company, Italian. It didn't seem to shoot very well, and was unknown to us as normally we got our 9mm in brown boxes. Anyway, the boys were chomping about it, and I thought it a bit of a morale issue, and thought I'd better do something. I found a loggie company that I thought were third line support, and arranged a big ammo swap, we got normal brown boxes, they got about 10,000 rounds back that were broken down and loose, but I'd...
    • Kent on The SA80 A2 is “perfect” for the Army, but not Royal Marines@monkey - "OMG" From the article: "...; any production shortfalls at Lake City are outsourced to private companies within the United States." Winchester, Federal, Hornady, and Remington all make milspec ammo. They also have the capability to quickly turn almost all their sporting ammunition capacity to military ammunition. (I have several "boxes" of 5.56x45mm M885 62 grain "Green Tip" ammunition manufactured by Winchester in my stores.) On the other hand, in 1982 I was issued .50 BMG 4/1 API/API-T manufactured by Lake City with headstamps indicating that they were made in 1944. They worked just fine.
    • Observer on Is the USA about to force the rest of NATO to change calibres again?Kent, how would being more gung ho in Afghanistan "win" you the "war"? You can hold all the ground you want, your enemy is living within your zone of control, so what is the point? The problem was always about target ID, not area domination, you can hold a town, but your enemy looks like a normal civilian, so he can simply walk around your "occupied" town provided he doesn't do anything too obvious. If the Taliban were so kind as to wear uniforms and form up into units and armies for you to shoot at, it would be a...
    • Kent on Is the USA about to force the rest of NATO to change calibres again?@Phil - "I suspect many soldiers would probably favour an Garand (mr.fred) Until the novelty wore off or until they ran out of ammunition." There were Marines in Vietnam that resisted the M16 and refused to turn in their M14s. M14s that were withdrawn and placed in storage were pulled out of storage and issued to Marine, SF, and regular infantry units as DMRs/EMRs (M39) once the need was established in Iraq and Afghanistan with many restocked using the SAGE system. Seems those Marines were just ahead of their time.
    • Red Trousers on The SA80 A2 is “perfect” for the Army, but not Royal MarinesSod the ammo weight calcs vs range/hitting power (had to do enough of them in the past on a directed paper for a GPMG replacement option). Can you reliably batter the enemy to death with the butt end? It's the only measure of performance that matters.
    • The Other Chris on Integrating Complex Weapons and AircraftIt also can't deliver as much power for as long.
    • The Other Chris on Integrating Complex Weapons and AircraftFor Mk9 read Mk9a above. Only so far my predictive text goes. Apologies for confusion. In a nutshell Mk9a has a weaker airframe and limited growth potential.
    • DavidNiven on Integrating Complex Weapons and Aircraft'AW159 does not have the same transmission as the Mk9' Does it have the same transmission of the MK9A? I don't know myself but the MK9a has performed pretty well in Afghan. 'Airframe is stronger, increased to 12,000hr life, has a far higher growth potential' Although the MK9A has a lighter airframe? @TOC can you tell me what we are actually paying for, and why?
    • ArmChairCivvy on The SA80 A2 is “perfect” for the Army, but not Royal MarinesThe article is dated 2010... but what do we do (MASS contract)? I was more looking at the three different scenarios, and the number of expended rounds "This chart shows the total small-arms ammunition required by the Army for three existing and possible situations: for peacetime operations and training after the Cold War" CAN'T PASTE IT HERE, but in short - 0.7 bn rounds across calibers; - as opposed to that number (before the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001) during fiscal year 2005 the number rose to 1.7 bn (2007 was the peak, I believe) - but during the...
    • monkey on Holidaying in the CrimeaMnsr Hollande's vist his Dacha surely
    • as on The Red MenaceA lot of called to cockpit in 2013. 137 up from 85 the previous year.
    • mr.fred on Is the USA about to force the rest of NATO to change calibres again?Phil, Would WW2 have turned out differently if one of the armies had chosen a different cartridge? It's possible, but difficult, if not impossible, to predict. While it seems like small fry to the ebb and flow of the much larger conflict, turning points can be based on very small happenstance. A section has enough ammunition rather than running out and being forced back, a unit can engage the enemy at slightly longer range, or suffer fewer losses clearing a town and so resist the counter-attack. All these sort of things can depend on such small factors. Then there is...
    • monkey on The SA80 A2 is “perfect” for the Army, but not Royal Marines@ACC The US relies on 1 plant for it nitrocellulouse production and 1 plant for it small arms ammunition supply? OMG
    • Craig on The Red MenaceRussian long range patrols were officially resumed in 2007 apparently. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/6950986.stm
    • ArmChairCivvy on Is the USA about to force the rest of NATO to change calibres again?Now I can understand the decision better: "MacArthur was the Army Chief of Staff that made the M1 Garand decision in 1932."
    • Phil on Is the USA about to force the rest of NATO to change calibres again?By my count, if one tenth of one percent of the population of Helmand were insurgents, they would outnumber a single US parachute battalion by more than two to one. (1400 vs.just shy of 600 for a 1944 parachute battalion at full strength) They weren't though. At least not at one time. You'd be surprised how much trouble quite small bands of blokes were causing, especially when they were being replaced steadily. Not to mention you'd need at least 3:1 to even begin to think about over-running even an isolated WWII battalion in defensive positions. I suspect many soldiers would...
    • mr.fred on Is the USA about to force the rest of NATO to change calibres again?Phil, By my count, if one tenth of one percent of the population of Helmand were insurgents, they would outnumber a single US parachute battalion by more than two to one. (1400 vs.just shy of 600 for a 1944 parachute battalion at full strength) Of course if we let that single battalion have support units, air support, or only assigned them to a relatively small area, it would be different. If you want to break it down to a Garand to an M4 in Afghanistan I suspect many soldiers would probably favour an Garand. I would imagine that many servicemen...
    • TED on The Red MenaceSooo what was happening in 2007? Georgia?
    • ArmChairCivvy on The SA80 A2 is “perfect” for the Army, but not Royal Marineshttp://www.almc.army.mil/alog/issues/SepOct10/spectrum_smallarms_ammo.html
    • ArmChairCivvy on The SA80 A2 is “perfect” for the Army, but not Royal MarinesCan't find the context for the 400 mn for a mth (was not attributed), but a normal US production would take you thru the first 3 months ... If you happen to be the USA
    • Kent on This is what happens when you leave the window open@ACC - Okay. They make all kinds of fancy-ass tents. :D
    • Kent on Is the USA about to force the rest of NATO to change calibres again?@ACC - General Douglas MacArthur was the Army Chief of Staff that made the M1 Garand decision in 1932. :D
    • ArmChairCivvy on This is what happens when you leave the window openKent, they make all kinds http://m.drash.com/products/Shelters/SpecialtyShelters/ArcticTent.aspx
    • ArmChairCivvy on Is the USA about to force the rest of NATO to change calibres again?Phil, I agree. The big question is who paid for them to be kept supplied, not just the wages. Of course the answer is not circulated much, because that money is too much a merry-goround for political convenience.
    • The Other Chris on Integrating Complex Weapons and AircraftAW159 does not have the same transmission as the Mk9. Tail rotor system, winglets and boom are a new design, reducing the amount of engine power required to deliver the same counter-torque, especially at cruise. Gearbox redesigned to for higher continuous power SHP to get more out of the same engines as the Mk9/300. Airframe is stronger, increased to 12,000hr life, has a far higher growth potential. Lets you carry larger engines and replace the gearbox/transmission in future as well as carry more weight now and then. Crash worthiness ratings increased. Avionics and tactical systems are now plug and play...
    • Mark Evans on A Trip Down Mexeflote LaneMade many of these very heavy pieces of kit, even made them in South Georgia and the Falkland Islands.
    • Phil on The SA80 A2 is “perfect” for the Army, but not Royal MarinesThats over 400mn bullets for a month long war. That's well above even total US monthly ammo consumption in 1944/45 which should tell you there's something wrong with your assumptions.
    • Phil on Is the USA about to force the rest of NATO to change calibres again?I rather suspect that, given freedom of operation on either side, the Taliban would wipe the Paras out, simply by outnumbering them rather handily. Then you operate under a misunderstanding about how big the "insurgency" in Afghanistan was / is. There were never large numbers of the insurgent - just a constant flow.
    • ArmChairCivvy on Is the USA about to force the rest of NATO to change calibres again?Kent, that was a good point (to remind us all) and ordered by no lesser a man than marshall Marshall ... I guess he was busily trying to cobble together an army that could fight a war - or two, if you take the American perspective. Asia-PAC and Europe. So if it ain't broke, don't fix it. But we are not in that situation now? Except for the"pivot" but that really does not affect the infantryman level of thinking, (about kit).
    • ArmChairCivvy on Integrating Complex Weapons and AircraftAren't we all forgetting those 8 "light" attack Widcats that were nibbled away equally, I seem to remember, from the army/navy allocated numbers. Fully marinised Able to fly from smaller decks No spec seen... Well, I haven't Supposedly the " gunships" for the smaller scale,more sneaky RM/ SF ops, when you don't want to advertise in advance by sending the one Apache capable ship (Ocean/ QE)?
    • DomS on The SA80 A2 is “perfect” for the Army, but not Royal Marines@wf Thanks, I thought that was the case. But the article makes it sound like all Marines need a different rifle.
    • Kent on This is what happens when you leave the window openIt's a fancy-ass tent. Not exactly what I envision when I see the word "shelter" in a military context.
    • paul g on 40mm Cased Telescopic Cannon Goes into ProductionAs I'm a fanboy of the CMI can I just clarify I wouldn't want it as a "tank" I would use it for the role that CMI state which is arty support. It has an angle of elevation of +42 degrees, at the moment UK armed forces has for arty support the 105mm light gun and then it jumps to a choice of 155mm AS90 or GMLRS!! by placing it in the warrior orbat, utilising surplus hulls you get an inbetween system on a common chassis
    • Frenchie on The Story of FRES – 2011Here is a short video about the vehicle. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AU3DltG6kXU
    • ArmChairCivvy on 40mm Cased Telescopic Cannon Goes into ProductionMy link is about Bushmaster, just saw mr. Fred's comment, so thought that better add the clarification. - btw, the 35mm pieces in service are upgradable to 40
    • ArmChairCivvy on 40mm Cased Telescopic Cannon Goes into ProductionSome confusion here... i like Jed's point about hosing them yourself, rather than calling for fires. That has mortars covered as they are an integral infantry weapon and arty is not. Next, all the GMGs and lighter alternatives are just hand grenades being dropped further and further out. It is great that the CT40 is now getting the AB. However,it only has a dual feed to switch between. The early Bofors 40 mm airbursting was a specialist round and I think they built 3 feeds to switch between in their own CV IFV. Setting the fuse (timer) was fully automated,...
    • mr.fred on 40mm Cased Telescopic Cannon Goes into ProductionJed, I rather suspect that the time fuse for the air bursting shell adds to the cost, so while you could use it for PD work, it would be more expensive. As for Apache, comparing the CT40 to the M230 it seems to be a rule of five. The French gun is five times the weight, fires a cartridge five times the volume and at one-third the rate. It wouldn't surprise me if the cartridge weight was five times too. I doubt that Apache could sustain the weight or the recoil and the low rate of fire would make effect...
    • paul g on The Story of FRES – 2011@frenchie, I was fooled by the photograph it looks quite compact in that shot!!! Still a fan of the CMI turret systems though
    • Frenchie on What Next after LandroverI did not think that you could be interested by small French vehicles, here a video of some vehicles that we produce. It lasts 8 minutes. I don't know if you've already seen this one. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IVBAHfnRC7U
    • Kent on Is the USA about to force the rest of NATO to change calibres again?@mr.fred - During my 20+ years in the US Army, I kept hearing about making weapons and ammo lighter to "lessen the infantryman's load," while they kept increasing all the crap that they were supposed to carry. And, after making weapons and ammo lighter, some of the troops complained about the "ineffectiveness" of the new weapons/ammo "system." Inertia is a terrible mistress. I've pointed out earlier that the M-1Garand was originally designed to be a 10-shot .276 Pedersen instead of an 8-shot .30-06 but was issued as the latter because there were billions of rounds of .30-06 ammo in the...
    • DavidNiven on Integrating Complex Weapons and AircraftTD, If we really wanted an airframe that the was useful to the Navy, RM and Army we would have really bought NH90/Blackhawk type airframes. Or am I being a bit cynical when I think both the dark blue and AW share holders were stamping their feet at the time of the deal, not to mention a cushy job for an ex defence sec and no doubt some senior officers?
    • Think Defence on Integrating Complex Weapons and AircraftIts an old joke, but the Army has always cut about in the best maritime helicopters money can buy
    • DavidNiven on 40mm Cased Telescopic Cannon Goes into Production'Dont forget we also have 40mm grenade launchers in direct fire, fire support, either from RWS or from ring mounts on vehicles. These two can be fitted with Air bursting kits.' Didn’t someone mention a few months back that post Herrick the GMG's are only going to be used by the Para's and RM?
    • DavidNiven on Integrating Complex Weapons and Aircraft'Can an LMM and FASGW(H) equipped Wildcat, bearing in mind the latters land attack mode, perform the role currently fulfilled by Apache?' That's my point we are buying brand new helicopters that are not needed, and which are going to pull funds away from airframes already in service. The MK9A Lynx (which have the same engines and transmission, with a lighter airframe) can fulfil the role of battlefield scout and we have Apache for the AH role. Rather than saving money and continuing to use the Lynx and then be able to upgrade the Apache we will have a bun...
    • GAB on 40mm Cased Telescopic Cannon Goes into ProductionJed, SA, Thanks for the comments - you raise some good points. The physics are always going to favor an air burst 6 or 8cm mortar over a direct fire weapon for fragmentation dispersion and velocity provided there is a clear trajectory (and there isn't always). I also forgot about the use of a roof mounted 6cm mortar in the Merkava tank. 120mm, .50 cal, 7.62mm, and small mortar seem to cover all requirements! GAB
    • mr.fred on Is the USA about to force the rest of NATO to change calibres again?Kent, I wonder what your point is.? Should we revert to the weapons we fought the second world war with, because that's the last time the US army was successful? ;) I rather suspect that, given freedom of operation on either side, the Taliban would wipe the Paras out, simply by outnumbering them rather handily.
    • Kent on Defence for 2015 and Beyond – Part 10 Conclusion@Dan Entwisle - The Hawk 200 (single-seater) has F-16 derived radar and can handle AMRAAM (and probably Meteor with some software upgrades) on the outer wing pylons. With Sidewinders/ASRAAM on the wingtip, AMRAAM on the outer pylons and a 27mm Mauser cannon mounted internally (since the original plan for 2-25mm ADEN guns was nixed due to crappy guns) an updated Hawk 200 would make an excellent point defense aircraft. Drop tanks would allow significant time on station, or the inner pylons/centerline station could be used for more missiles. With Link 16, a non-radar equipped, armed Hawk T.2 could still launch...
    • mr.fred on The SA80 A2 is “perfect” for the Army, but not Royal MarinesThe Other Chris, Success or failure, the CT40 will inform as to the suitability of CT ammunition.
    • The Other Chris on Integrating Complex Weapons and AircraftInteresting point. Suggest we explore the opposite case. Can an LMM and FASGW(H) equipped Wildcat, bearing in mind the latters land attack mode, perform the role currently fulfilled by Apache? What is missing from its equipment and specifications for the role? e.g. GAU-19 pod, Brimstone integration? What could Wildcat being to the role? e.g. Superior maritime deployment and safety for crew?