German Security Policy – White Paper

The introduction from Angela Merkel in the German Security Policy – White Paper, that has today been approved by the German Cabinet;

The world of 2016 is unsettled. We in Germany and Europe are seeing and feeling the impact of a lack of freedom and of crises and conflicts. We are experiencing that peace and stability are not a matter of course even in Europe.

In this changed security situation, the task of the Federal Government is to redefine our country’s security policy interests, priorities and objectives and to develop its toolbox responsibly. The past years have shown that we must not take the achievements of the European post-war order for granted. We would not have believed it possible that borders would be redrawn by military force and in breach of international law in Europe in the 21st  century. Wars and conflicts are raging on Europe’s doorstep. They have cost the lives of hundreds of thousands of people and uprooted millions more. At the same time, fragile and failing states provide a fertile breeding ground for Islamist terrorism, which also poses a direct threat to us in Germany and Europe.

The past years have shown that we must not take the achievements of the European post-war order for granted. We would not have believed it possible that borders would be redrawn by military force and in breach of international law in Europe in the 21st  century. Wars and conflicts are raging on Europe’s doorstep. They have cost the lives of hundreds of thousands of people and uprooted millions more. At the same time, fragile and failing states provide a fertile breeding ground for Islamist terrorism, which also poses a direct threat to us in Germany and Europe. Cyber space is increasingly becoming a theatre of conflict; the internet is not only a force for good – ideologies of hatred and violence are also spread there. Germany’s economic and political weight means that it is our duty to take on responsibility for Europe’s security in association with our European and transatlantic partners in order to defend human rights, freedom, democracy, the rule of law and international law. We must stand up even more for our shared values and demonstrate

Germany’s economic and political weight means that it is our duty to take on responsibility for Europe’s security in association with our European and transatlantic partners in order to defend human rights, freedom, democracy, the rule of law and international law. We must stand up even more for our shared values and demonstrate even greater commitment to security, peace and a rules-based order than we have done to date.

Our security is based on a strong and resolute North Atlantic Alliance and a united and resilient European Union. We will only be able to meet the great challenges of our era successfully if we strengthen and further develop these two pillars of our foreign, security and defence policy.

At all times, our aim should be to prevent crises and conflicts. Security policy must be forward-looking and sustainable. At the same time, we must be able to react quickly to violent conflicts, to provide help and to play our part in resolving conflicts rapidly. To this end, it is vital that we combine our civil and military instruments. But we must also take an honest, realistic view of the world: We will not be able to meet all of the challenges in the crisis regions on our own. This means that our partners in other regions of the world must do their part. To this end, we will offer a wide range of measures to enable them to resolve crises and conflicts by themselves. Furthermore, we need to strengthen resilience throughout government and society in Germany and the European Union. Only in this way will we safeguard our open society and protect the freedom that is fundamental to our way of life.

The White Paper on German Security Policy and the Future of the Bundeswehr describes the cornerstones of Germany’s security policy and the framework within which it operates. It identifies for the Federal Government areas where German security policy can be shaped. The White Paper sets the basis for the future course of the Bundeswehr as one of the instruments of German security policy. In recent years, the Bundeswehr has taken part in numerous missions abroad side by side with Germany’s allies and partners. Along with German police officers and civilian aid workers, it has made a significant contribution to peace in the world. Our Bundeswehr will also be called upon in the future. In all operations, it demonstrates our willingness to uphold peace and security and resolutely defend our freedom. The Federal Government therefore has a responsibility and an obligation to provide the Bundeswehr with the necessary resources.

A further aim of this White Paper is to generate a debate in society on how Germany shapes its security policy in the future. It is thus my hope that the broad-based, lively discourse which began during the drafting of this White Paper will be continued fruitfully after its publication.

Click the image to read and download the paper…

German Security White Paper

 

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8 Comments on "German Security Policy – White Paper"

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HMArmedForcesReview

Will disappoint some as it doesn’t go into military specifics eg how many future tanks, ships, fighter jets

El Sid

By way of context – Germany spends 1.19% of GDP on defence, and around 13% of that budget on equipment compared to 23-25% by France/UK/US.

Senior Moment

And at 1.19 % of GDP gives Donald Trump’s anti NATO rhetoric more traction at home.

James

Does this mean Germany will finally wake up and man up to the threats we face? Hope so..been dragging their heels for far to long, maybe this will be a turning point for NATO and spur other members into action

S O

@ El Sid:
http://preview.tinyurl.com/j2y5q9l

13.6% buying equipment
8.3% spares, repairs
2.5% infrastructure
2.2% R&D
0.6% other investment

The spending is easily enough considering the marginal threat situation and alliance, but the allocation of resources is worthy of improvement.

Never before have we wanted Germany to march east so much.

JohnHartley

So now that the UK is not there to say no to an EU Army, will Merkel & Hollande push for it? & if they do, will it play into the hands of the alternative for Germany & Marie Le Pen?

Frenchie

@JohnHartley,
If Merkel is no longer Chancellor of Germany I would not cry. Marine Le Pen would put us in a very difficult position because not only she is xenophobic but she wants to get France out of the EU and the euro area.
It is almost certain that the next French president shall be from the Conservative Party, and that the candidate nominated in a year will want to strengthen European cooperation at the industrial level, but from there to say that the EU will build a European army is go far, France knows that it can count only on its own forces, moreover it is planned by the Conservative party to reach 2% of GDP for national defense in 2025.

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