Cobham PinPoint Gunshot Detection System

From Cobham

Cobham’s PinPoint™ Gunshot Detection System provides the capability in both urban and rural environments to rapidly locate the source of hostile fire, and provide accurate range, bearing and elevation information to the user and the Battle Management System

Cobham PinPoint™ Gunshot Detection System

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 Cobham PinPoint Gunshot Detection System

Yet more weight and battery load for dubious value, or, the best thing since bread was sliced?

 

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11 thoughts on “Cobham PinPoint Gunshot Detection System

  1. wf

    Great stuff, but as another separate computer hanging off the PBI, you wonder why the hell we don’t just replace the PRR with a smartphone which can connect by bluetooth to all these sensors, and on which we can install various apps to interface with them…

  2. old guard

    As an old ex light infantryman this sounds to me like one of two things or possibly a combination of both.1 someone in defense thinks that electronic gadgetry of this sort is better than training soldiers properly or they think hard realistic training is too dangerous or expensive and obsolete.2 someone in defense is getting there palm’s greased with a nice wad of cash. Or perhaps a bit of both.Anyone ever heard of the crack and thump technique ? I was taught this at the infantry training center at ft.Benning,Ga. by drill sergeant’s who were Vietnam combat veterans.when you hear the super sonic crack of the bullet pass by you you immediately start counting 1thousand1 1 thousand 2 1thousand 3 if you hear the muzzle blast at for example 1 thousand 2 then the enemy is 2 hundred meters away.quite simple and effective. no electronics necessary .

  3. Obsvr

    Devices of this sort have been around for decades, they are just getting smaller. Obviously the vehicle mounted ones are useful given the difficulty of hearing anything outside an AFV.

  4. Chris Werb

    I think Claribel X-band radar based system was used in NI at least as far back as the mid 1980s – obviously it was bigger and didn’t give such precise location info.

    I wonder if anyone has linked one of these units to an RWS yet – that way an incoming round would immediately get the crosshairs of an MG or GL on the firer and the system operator would just have to decide if RoE allowed him to press the trigger.

  5. Phil

    I wonder if anyone has linked one of these units to an RWS yet – that way an incoming round would immediately get the crosshairs of an MG or GL on the firer and the system operator would just have to decide if RoE allowed him to press the trigger.

    I vaguely recall being briefed it could be done on HERRICK 13 when we were getting shown around Boomerang and other bits of kit as part of RSOI. Press a button and the turret would slave to the target indication given by Boomerang. Now I don’t know how effective it was but the cross hairs aren’t going to land on a bloke, only point on the right bearing. Very often in practice that means the turret is going to slave to a wall with small firing ports in it or some well hidden bunkers etc It is also not going to be very effective against an enemy who takes his field-craft seriously and moves firing position between engagements.

  6. Phil

    quite simple and effective.

    Arguably pretty shit.

    I only ever remember hearing and feeling the cracks – if you can hear cracks they are close enough to fuck you up – hear a swish and they’re very far away. But perhaps I was just crap at fieldcraft.

  7. Chris Werb

    The South Koreans have developed a remote sentry system that is essentially a static RWS that detects people biometrically and tracks them – presumably detecting a combination of shape and movement. If you had that coupled to the threat detector, it should work better (though obviously not against enemies using decent fieldcraft, fortifications etc.)

  8. a

    when you hear the super sonic crack of the bullet pass by you you immediately start counting 1thousand1 1 thousand 2 1thousand 3 if you hear the muzzle blast at for example 1 thousand 2 then the enemy is 2 hundred meters away.quite simple and effective.

    The maths on that doesn’t really work. Rifle bullets go at roughly 1000 m/s and sound goes at 340 m/s. So if someone fires a bullet at you from 200m away, the timetable is:
    0.0s round fired
    0.2s round passes by your ear
    0.6s muzzle blast reaches your ear.
    So there’s a 0.4s delay, not a 1 second delay. The difference between a firer 100m away and a firer 300m away is barely half a second in crack-to-thump time.
    And, of course, that doesn’t tell you bearing, just range.

  9. Observer

    Chris W, it seems to be standard for our (Singapore’s) new wheeled APCs. RWS slaved to a weapon detection system.

    How effective it is, I’ve no idea, have not hands on for that yet, and most likely never, different branch armour vs infantry.

    Might help with confined areas though, the echos can be pretty confusing. Lots of new toys, same ole monkey brain.

    Biggest weakness in our equipment though is the lack of opportunities for field trials. No idea how it’s going to stand up unless you do it for real, but at the same time, these are items you also wish would never be used.

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